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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 456 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 154 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 72 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 64 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 58 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 54 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 40 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 38 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 36 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Delaware (Delaware, United States) or search for Delaware (Delaware, United States) in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 1: effect of the battle of Bull's Run.--reorganization of the Army of the Potomac.--Congress, and the council of the conspirators.--East Tennessee. (search)
litary Departments, The counties of Washington and Alleghany, in Maryland, were added to the Department of the Shenandoah, created on the 19th of July, with Headquarters in the field; and the remainder of Maryland, and all of Pennsylvania and Delaware, constituted the Department of Pennsylvania, Headquarters at Baltimore. A Board was also established at this time for the examination of all officers of volunteer regiments. and Lieutenant-General Scott, who was the General-in-Chief of the armilaimed to the world. For the latter purpose it passed an act Aug. 8, 1861. which authorized the banishment from the limits of the Confederate States of every masculine citizen of the United States (with some exceptions named The citizens of Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, Missouri, the Territories of New Mexico, Arizona, and the Indian Territory south of Kansas, and the District of Columbia, were excepted.) over fourteen years of age, who adhered to his Government and acknowledged its authori
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 6: the Army of the Potomac.--the Trent affair.--capture of Roanoke Island. (search)
eet consisted of thirty-one gun-boats, with an aggregate armament of ninety-four guns. These were the Brickner, commanded by J. C. Giddings; Ceres, S. A. McDermaid; Chasseur, John West; corn. Barney, R. D. Renshaw; corn. Perry, C. H. Flusser; Delaware, S. P. Quackenbush; granite, E. Boomer; granite, W. B. Avery; Gen. Putnam, W. J. Hoskiss; Huzzar, Fred. Crocker; Hunchback, E. R. Calhoun; Hetzel, H. K. Davenport; J. Nv. Seymour, F. S. Welles; Louisiana, Hooker; Lockwood, S. L. Graves; Lancer, followed Feb. 9, 1862. by Captain Rowan. It had gone up Albemarle Sound thirty or forty miles, and into the Pasquotank River, toward Elizabeth City, not far southeast of the great Dismal Swamp. Rowan's fleet consisted of fourteen vessels, the Delaware being his flag-ship. On the morning of the 10th it was in the River near Elizabeth City, and confronting seven steamers and a schooner armed with two 32-pounders, and a four-gun battery on the shore, and one heavy gun in the town in front. The
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 12: operations on the coasts of the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. (search)
naval howitzers that Rowan put ashore, under Lieutenant R. S. McCook, to assist in the attack. with great difficulty and fatigue, through the wet clay, into which men often sank knee deep. The head of the column was within a mile and a half of the Confederate works at sunset, when it halted and bivouacked. During the night the remainder of the army came up in detachments hour after hour, meeting no resistance. The gun-boats meanwhile had moved up the river abreast the army, the flag-ship Delaware leading. A shore-battery opened upon her at four o'clock in the afternoon, but was soon quieted by her reply. The main body of the Confederates, under the command of General Branch, consisted of eight regiments of infantry and five hundred cavalry, with three batteries of field-artillery of six guns each. These occupied a line of intrenchments extending more than a mile from near the river across the railway, supported by another line, on the inland flank, of rifle-pits and detached in
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 21: slavery and Emancipation.--affairs in the Southwest. (search)
le of making selections. The ticket thus formed has been presented. Among the names we find those of Wm. L. Goggin, of Bedford, and R. T. Daniel, of Richmond; E. H. Fitzhugh, of Ohio County; John B. Edmunds, of Halifax, and C. W. Newton, of Norfolk City. Every district in the State is embraced in this editorial report. commenced its session under the Permanent Constitution of the Confederate States. In this assembly all of the slave-labor States were represented excepting Maryland and Delaware. For a list of the members of the Provisional Congress see page 468. The oath to support the Constitution of the Confederate States was administered to the Senators by R. M. T. Hunter, of Virginia, and to the Representatives by Howell Cobb, of Georgia. Thomas Bocock, of Virginia, was elected Speaker. On the following day the votes for President of the Confederacy were counted, and were found to be one hundred and nine in number, all of which were cast for Jefferson Davis. The votes