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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 608 608 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 21 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 20 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 16 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 14 14 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 13 13 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 13 13 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 12 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 10 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for April, 1865 AD or search for April, 1865 AD in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 2: Lee's invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania. (search)
verer, or ruler. This was adopted by both Houses, and then it was proposed to send some one through the lines to New York, to procure an engraving of the same on brass and steel. This was objected to, and the commission was finally given to an engraver in England. The writer was informed by Mr. Davis, of Wilmington, N. C., the Confederate Attorney-General, that the engraving was not completed in time for use. It had just arrived at Richmond when the evacuation of that city occurred, in April, 1865, and no impression from it was ever made. That pretended Government never had an insignia of sovereignty. None of its officers ever bore a commission with its seal; and the writer was informed that many officers of high rank in the Confederate army never received a commission. Proposed Confederate State seal. this is copied from a rude wood-cut, at the head of a certificate of honorary directorship of a Confederate Association for the relief of maimed soldiers. the object of that A
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 10: the last invasion of Missouri.--events in East Tennessee.--preparations for the advance of the Army of the Potomac. (search)
of Spottsylvania Court-House, and pushing rapidly toward Richmond, struck the Virginia Central railway, at Beaver Dam Station, on the evening of the 29th, where had his first serious encounter with the Confederates. While small parties were out, tearing up the road and destroying public property, he was. attacked by some troops that came up from Richmond, under the Maryland traitor, Belle Isle this is from a sketch made by the author immediately after the evacuation of Richmond, in April, 1865, from the high bank of the James River, near the Tredegar works. Looking across that stream southward. Bradley T. Johnson. These he defeated, in a sharp skirmish, when he struck across the South Anna, and cut the Fredericksburg and Richmond railway at Kilby Station. This accomplished, he pushed on by Ashland, and along the Brooks turnpike, and, early on the first day of March, 1864. halted within three miles and a half of Richmond, and within its outer line of fortifications, at w
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 18: capture of Fort Fisher, Wilmington, and Goldsboroa.--Sherman's March through the Carolinas.--Stoneman's last raid. (search)
ving fled from Richmondi was at Charlotte with a very considerable force; and the mounted men of Vaughn and Duke, who had come down from the borders of Virginia, were on the Catawba. On that account it was necessary to move with great Railway bridge over the Catawba River. the writer is indebted to Major Moderwell for the above picture of the bridge. caution. At Dallas Moderwell had a skirmish with these cavalry leaders, but evaded a battle with them; and at daybreak on the 19th, April, 1865. the Union force arrived at the doomed bridge, where they captured the picket and surprised the guard. The bridge, delineated in the engraving, was a splendid structure, eleven hundred and fifty feet in length, and fifty feet above the water. Moderwell's men set it on fire at one end, and in thirty minutes it was completely destroyed. After skirmishing with Ferguson's Confederate cavalry (which came up on the north side of the bridge) for two hours, the raiders turned back, and, by mar
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 19: the repossession of Alabama by the Government. (search)
. These guns were now turned upon Forts Huger and Tracy, at the mouth of the Appalachee or Blakely River, which held out gallantly until the night of the 11th, April, 1865. when the garrison spiked the twelve guns that armed the two forts, and fled. The defense of Spanish Fort was skillfully and gallantly conducted, under Generpt away the pontoon bridge, 870 feet in length, which Hubbard had thrown across the river, Wilson's army did not make the passage of the stream until the 10th. April, 1865. McCook had rejoined him on the 5th, and now the whole army, excepting Croxton's brigade, on detached service, moved upon Montgomery, where General Wirt Adams wMacon, but Croxton's brigade was still absent, and Wilson felt some uneasiness concerning its safety. All apprehensions were ended by its arrival on the 31st, April, 1865. after many adventures. We left Croxton not far from Tuscaloosa, in Alabama, on the 2d of April, outnumbered by Jackson, of Forrest's command. See page 51
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 21: closing events of the War.--assassination of the President. (search)
fth Corps, were far in advance, and on the afternoon of the 4th April, 1865. he struck the Danville road at Jetersville, seven miles southweake further efforts to escape, and success in battle on the 7th April, 1865. encouraged him. Humphreys had crossed the Appomattox with the SGrant did not receive Lee's reply until the morning of the 8th, April, 1865. when he instantly dispatched a response, saying, Peace being my were fed from the National stores; and on Wednesday, the 12th, April, 1865. they were marched by divisions to an appointed place, near Appodid not receive any communication from Johnston until the 16th, April, 1865. when a message reached Kilpatrick, from Hampton, saying it was Sherman's Headquarters, at Raleigh, on the morning of the 24th, April, 1865. and directed that officer to communicate the decision of the Goence in a railway carriage. There they remained until the 15th, April 1865. when, it being seen that the surrender of Johnston was inevitabl
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 22: prisoners.-benevolent operations during the War.--readjustment of National affairs.--conclusion. (search)
Atlanta, a sick soldier, who was near what was called the dead-line, beyond which prisoners were not allowed to go, put his hand over to pluck a bunch of leaves, that were not a foot from the boundary. The instant he did so, the guard caught sight of him, fired, and killed him.--Report of the Committee of the United States Sanitary Commission, September, 1864. The conduct of the National authorities toward the Confederate captives in Libby Prison, after the former entered Richmond, in April, 1865, was in marked contrast to that of the agents of the Conspirators. There were not more than twenty-five prisoners on each floor. The rooms were kept clean and well-ventilated, and sup. plied with an abundance of pure water; and sympathizing friends were allowed to furnish the prisoners with whatever they pleased. The writer, who was in Richmond a few days after its evacuation by Lee, visited Libby Prison. He saw dozens of knapsacks let down by ropes from the windows, filled by a crowd