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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 264 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 162 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 92 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 86 0 Browse Search
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 80 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 36 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for Brazil (Brazil) or search for Brazil (Brazil) in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 16: career of the Anglo-Confederate pirates.--closing of the Port of Mobile — political affairs. (search)
on these points, could give, not only considered these vessels and their crews in that light, but said so in his diplomatic correspondence. In his letter to the Brazilian minister, on the occasion we are considering, he said, that the Government maintained that the Florida like the Alabama, was a pirate, belonging to no nation or lawful belligerent, and, therefore, the harboring and supplying of these piratical ships and their crews, in belligerent ports, were wrongs and injuries for which Brazil justly owes reparation to the United States, as ample as the reparation she now receives from them. Consult, also, page 570, of volume II., and note 1, page 556, volume I. Of this work. John A. Winslow. long before the Florida was seized, the career of the Georgia was ended, the Georgia was an iron ship, built in Glasgow. She went to sea with the name of Japan, in April, 1868. off the coast of France she received her armament, changed her name to Georgia, and began the career of