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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 456 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 154 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 72 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 64 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 58 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 54 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 40 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 38 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 36 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for Delaware (Delaware, United States) or search for Delaware (Delaware, United States) in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 2: Lee's invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania. (search)
. On the same day, General Sanford, of New York City, issued an order for the regiments of the First Division of that State to proceed forthwith to Harrisburg, to assist in repelling the invasion of Pennsylvania. In addition to these, about 1,800 volunteers from various parts of the State were organized and equipped, and sent to Harrisburg. On the 20th of June, about 50,000 men had Responded to the President's call. New York had furnished 15,000; Pennsylvania, 25,000; New Jersey, 3,000; Delaware, 2,000; Maryland, 5,000. A patriotic appeal of Governor Bradford, of the latter State, fully aroused the loyal people to action. Lee had about a week's start of Hooker in the race for the Potomac, and when the latter disappeared behind the Stafford hills, May 13. the occupants of Fredericksburg Heights marched for Culpepper. Longstreet, in position there, his ranks swelled by a part of Pickett's division, then moved along the eastern side of the Blue Ridge, and took possession of Ash
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 8: Civil affairs in 1863.--military operations between the Mountains and the Mississippi River. (search)
osition. The following is a list of the members of the XXXVIIIth Congress, with the names of the States they severally represented:-- Senate. California.--John Conness, James A. McDougall. Connecticut.--James Dixon, Lafayette S. Foster. Delaware.--George Read Riddle, Willard Saulsbury. Illinois.--W. A. Richardson, Lyman Trumbull. Indiana.--Thomas A. Hendricks, Henry S. Lane. Iowa.--James W. Grimes, James Harlan. Kansas.--James H. Lane, Samuel C. Pomeroy. Kentucky.--Lazarus W. Powell,in, Vice-President of the Republic and President of the Senate. House of Representatives. California.--Thomas B. Shannon, William Higbee, Cornelius Cole. Connecticut.--Henry C. Deming, James E. English, Augustus Brandegee, John H. Hubbard. Delaware.--Nathaniel B. Smithers. Illinois.--Isaac N. Arnold, John F. Farnsworth, Elihu B. Washburne, Charles M. Harris, Owen Lovejoy, Jesse O. Norton, John R. Eden, John T. Stuart, Lewis W. Ross, A. L. Knapp, J. C. Robinson, William R. Morrison, William
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 13: invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania-operations before Petersburg and in the Shenandoah Valley. (search)
passage of the Potomac by the Confederates, and their raiding within the borders of General Couch's Department; and finally, on the 5th of July, he was informed that their movements indicated an intention to march upon Baltimore or Washington in heavy column. Finding his Department thus threatened, Wallace took measures for checking the invaders at the Monocacy River, with the few available troops under his command. General Wallace assumed command of the Middle Department, consisting of Delaware and a portion of Maryland, on the 22d of March, 1864. That Department was then seemingly remote from danger, external and internal, and the entire number of available troops in it, and composed chiefly of Home Guards and One Hundred days men, did not much exceed 2,500. These were chiefly employed in garrisoning the forts and prisons in Maryland, and in co-operating with the troops in the Department of Washington, under General Augur, in guarding the fords of the Potomac as far up as Point
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 16: career of the Anglo-Confederate pirates.--closing of the Port of Mobile — political affairs. (search)
ln's re-election in the Electoral College by an unprecedented majority was secured. General McClellan received the vote of only the two late slave-labor States, Delaware and Kentucky, and the State of New Jersey. The offer of sympathy and protection to the soldiers in the field, by the Chicago Convention, had been answered by thing, Nesmith; California--Conness.--38. Only two of these affirmative votes were Democrats, namely, Johnson and Nesmith. The nays were all Democrats, namely: Delaware--Riddle, Saulsbury; Kentucky--Davis, Powell; Indiana--Hendricks; California--McDougall.--6. Six Democrats did not vote, namely, Buckalew of Pennsylvania; Wright sey--Starr; Pennsylvania--Bailey, Broomall, Coffroth, Hale, Kelly, McAllister, Moorhead, A. Myers, L. Myers, O'Neill, Scofield, Stevens, Thayer, Tracy, Williams; Delaware--Smithers; Maryland--Cresswell, Davis, Thomas, Webster; West Virginia--Blair, Brown, Whaley; Kentucky--Anderson, Kendall, Smith, Yeaman; Ohio--Ashley, Eckley, Ga
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 21: closing events of the War.--assassination of the President. (search)
re allowed to pay a commutation fee. The Provost-Marshal gives the following table of the amounts paid in this way, by the people of the several States:-- Maine $610,200 Connecticut $457,200 Maryland $1,131,900 Indiana $235,500 New Hampshire 286,500 New York 5,485,799 Dis't of Columbia 96,900 Michigan 614,700 Vermont 593,400 New Jersey 1,265,700 Kentucky 997,530 Wisconsin 1,533,600 Massachusetts 1,610,400 Pennsylvania 8,634,300 Ohio 1,978,887 Iowa 22,500 Rhode Island 141,300 Delaware 446,100 Illinois 15,900 Minnesota 316,800               Total             $26,366,316 This sum was collected by the Provost-Marshal's Bureau, at an expense of less than seven-tenths of one per cent., and without the loss of a dollar through neglect, accident, fraud, or otherwise. The whole number of negro troops recruited and enlisted during the war, was 186,017. Of these, about 1,490,000 were in actual service. Of this number, nearly 60,000 were killed on the field, an
eracy for six years, 2.567; his cabinet, 2.567; on the fall of Atlanta and Confederate finances, 3.454; flight of from Danville, 3.576; capture and imprisonment of, 3.578. Davis, John, heroism displayed by on board the Valley City, 2.175. Decatur, siege of by Hood, 3.417. Declaration of Independence of South Carolina, 1.111. Deep Bottom, lodgment effected at by Gen. Foster, 3.340; movement from against Richmond, 3.351, 353. Defenders of Fort Sumter, names of (note), 1.329. Delaware, loyal sentiment of the people of, 1.198. Devens, Gen., at the battle of Chancellorsville, 3.29. Dinwiddie Court-House, Sheridan at, 3.539. Dismal Swamp Canal, expedition under Commodore Rowan to obstruct (note), 2.315. Disunion, early threats of in the South (note), 1.63. Dix, Dorothea L., beneficent labors of, 1.575. Dix, Gen. John A., his telegram in relation to the American flag, 1.185; speech of in New York at the Union Square meeting, 1.355; appointed Secretary of th