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Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 34 0 Browse Search
Emil Schalk, A. O., The Art of War written expressly for and dedicated to the U.S. Volunteer Army. 20 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 18, 1864., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 28, 1864., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 4 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Emil Schalk, A. O., The Art of War written expressly for and dedicated to the U.S. Volunteer Army.. You can also browse the collection for Blucher or search for Blucher in all documents.

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Emil Schalk, A. O., The Art of War written expressly for and dedicated to the U.S. Volunteer Army., Example of a battle of the offensive defense: battle of Austerlitz, December 2, 1805. (search)
fully the campaign against the allies by falling on Blucher and Wellington, who, with their armies, amounting t of June, found himself and army in the quarters of Blucher, who, however, had managed to assemble the greater ith the main body, 65,000 men, attacked the army of Blucher. Ney, having advanced very late, found the forceay. Ney, at Quatre-Bras, was already in the rear of Blucher; Napoleon ordered him to leave this position, and ted to the next day, the 18th. In the mean while, Blucher retreated in the direction of Wavre, where he arrivm the 80,000 men present at the battle of the 16th, Blucher could assemble on the 17th about 40,000 or 45,000. vre is about five or six miles from Mont St. Jean. Blucher and Wellington concerted the measures to be taken fellington was to keep his position to the last, and Blucher was to arrive and join him in the course of the batrsuers. Only two or three batteries were saved. Blucher's cavalry pursued the enemy during the whole night
making a great circuit. The next day, Kutusoff tried to open himself a passage in the direction of Winterthur; in this attempt he lost a great part of his army. Passage of the Limmat by Massena 25th September 1799. Retreat and pursuit. the moment we leave the battle-field to retreat, our operation becomes one of Strategy as well as of Tactics. The direction in which we retreat is of the utmost importance. In the example of the battle of Waterloo this can easily he seen. If Blucher, after the battle of Ligny, had retreated to Namur, as many a general would have done, Wellington's army would have been lost, and a double defeat the consequence; his retreat to Wavre, and arrival at Belle Alliance, changed the defeat to the most decided victory. The direction of our retreat will depend on many circumstances. If we are co-operating with another army, we should retreat in this direction, to make a junction with it and obtain a central position between the enemy's armi