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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 18 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 14 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 12 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 10 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 10 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 1 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 8 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
Emil Schalk, A. O., The Art of War written expressly for and dedicated to the U.S. Volunteer Army. 6 0 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Emil Schalk, A. O., The Art of War written expressly for and dedicated to the U.S. Volunteer Army.. You can also browse the collection for Prague (Czech Republic) or search for Prague (Czech Republic) in all documents.

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ue or perpendicular lines should only be attempted when the aggressor is of very great superiority. Attacks in echelons may be used against an enemy who cannot easily move from his position, and can therefore undertake no concentric fire on the first echelon, as would be the case in the attack of an entrenched camp. Lines of battle with crotchets may be used by the aggressor; for the party attacked they are always dangerous, the corner being exposed to a concentric fire. The battle of Prague, fought by Frederick II. against the Austrians, will be the example for this order of battle. Convex lines of battle were used at Leipsic and on different other occasions; we are often obliged to use them after the passage of a river. They offer one great disadvantage; if broken at one point, the enemy finds himself at once in the rear of his adversary's whole formation of battle. Concave lines of battle have sometimes been used. Hannibal's formation at Cunna was such. They should,
Emil Schalk, A. O., The Art of War written expressly for and dedicated to the U.S. Volunteer Army., Example of battle where one wing forms a crotchet: battle of Prague, may 18, 1757. (search)
Example of battle where one wing forms a crotchet: battle of Prague, may 18, 1757. The Austrian army, amounting to about 80,000 men, had taken a position near Prague; this position, if well defended, it was scarcely possible to force--one wing bearing toward the Moldau, and the front and right wing covered by a small river and marshes. Only four small passages were left to the Prussians to attack the Austrian army. The Prussians, 64,000 men strong, take a position in C. The Austrians, to the Austrian right wing, attacked on all sides, is completely separated from the center, and obliged to retreat in an eccentric direction from the main army, which is now attacked in its flank and rear by Frederick's whole forces, and driven into Prague, where it is blockaded for several weeks. This battle, as well as that of Leuthen, shows well that Frederick knew how to fall with his whole force on the weak point of the enemy, and defeat him by a series of small fights. It shows, at the sa