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H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 2: Strategy.—General divisions of the Art.—Rules for planning a Campaign.—Analysis of the military operations of Napoleon (search)
ont forced him to abandon a plan which, if properly executed, had probably defeated the allies. Jomini pronounced it one of the most brilliant of his military career. Having explained the principan, (the former has been translated into French,) are considered as the best. The discussions of Jomini on this subject in his great work on the military art, are exceedingly valuable; also the writinsh, but the translation is exceedingly inaccurate. The military histories of Lloyd, Templehoff, Jomini, the Archduke Charles, Grimoard, Gravert, Souchet, St. Cyr, Beauvais, Laverne, Stutterheim, WagnThe technical terms, however, are very loosely employed. Precis de l'art de la Guerre, par le Baron Jomini. His chapter on strategy embodies the principles of this branch of the art. Grundsatze der St of 1812. Armstrong. All the above are works of merit; but none are more valuable to the military man than the military histories of Jomini and Kausler, with their splendid diagrams and maps.
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 3: Fortifications.Their importance in the defence of States proved by numerous historical examples (search)
thers, he delayed his advance till the place could be reduced. An army, says Jomini, may sometimes penetrate between places on an open frontier, to attack the enemccess depending entirely upon a good system of marches. On this subject, General Jomini, the great military historian of the wars of the French Revolution, remarksto the cruel alternative of submissions or destructionn Fortifidations, says Jomini, fulfil two objects of capital importance,--1st. The protection of the frontietions. The Archduke Charles, as a general, knew no rival but Napoleon, and General Jomini is universally regarded as the first military historian of the age. The tru of the eighteenth century, for at the beginning of the French Revolution, says Jomini, Germany had too few fortifications; they were generally of a poor character, as is discussed by Ternay, Vauban, Cormontaigne, Napoleon, the Archduke Charles, Jomini, Fallot, and, incidentally, by most of the military historians of the wars of t
ons of infantry, twelve squadrons of cavalry, five batteries of artillery, and three companies of engineers. Figure 10 represents the details of a camp of a battalion of infantry composed of eight companies. Figure 11 is the camp of a squadron of cavalry. Figure 12 is the camp of two batteries of foot artillery, or two companies of foot engineers. Figure 13 is the camp of two batteries of mounted artillery, or two companies of mounted sappers and pontoniers. On undulating or broken ground the arrangement and order of the general camp, as well as the details of the encampment of each arm, would admit of much variation. There are many valuable remarks on the various subjects comprised under the head of logistics, in the works of Jomini, Grimoard, Thiebault, Boutourlin, Guibert, Laroche Amyon, Bousmard, Ternay, Vauchelle, Odier, Audouin, Bardin, Chemevrieres, Daznan, Ballyet, Dremaux, Dupre d'aulnay, Morin, and in the published regulations and orders of the English army.
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 5: Tactics.The twelve orders of battle, with examples of each.—Different Formations of infantry, cavalry, artillery, and engineers on the field of battle, with the Modes of bringing troops into action (search)
gram with complete success, although he experienced enormous losses. But Ney's heavy columns of attack at Waterloo failed of success, and suffered terribly from the concentric fire of the enemy's batteries. Whenever deep columns are employed, Jomini recommends that the grand-division of twelve battalions should have one battalion on each flank, (Fig. 31,) marching by files, in order to protect its flanks from the enemy's attacks. Without this defence a column of twelve battalions deep beco the course of engineer instruction, so far as matured, for sappers, miners, and pontoniers, is based on the French manuals for the varied duties of this arm. On Grand Tactics, or Tactics of Battles, the military and historical writings of General Jomini abound in most valuable instructions. Napoleon's memoirs, and the writings of Rocquancourt, Hoyer, Decker, Okouneff, Rogniat, Jocquinot-de-Presle, Guibert, Duhesme, Gassendi, Warnery, Baron Bohan, Lindneau, Maiseroy, Millor, and Ternay, are
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 6: military Polity—The means of national defence best suited to the character and condition of a country, with a brief account of those adopted by the several European powers. (search)
sia before him. If Austria had pushed forward one hundred thousand men from Bohemia, on the Oder, she would, in all probability, says the best of military judges, Jomini, have struck a fatal blow to the operations of Napoleon, and his army must have been exceedingly fortunate even to regain the Rhine. But Austria preferred remaintizen-soldiery, who were established on the 14th of July, 1789, relied on exclusively for the national defence. But these three millions of national guards, says Jomini, though good supporters of the decrees of the assembly, were nevertheless useless for reinforcing the army beyond the frontiers, and utterly incapable of defendine it to the distrust and jealousy of most other nations. The fortifications for the defence of our sea-coast and land frontiers will be discussed hereafter. Jomini's work on the Military Art contains many valuable remarks on this subject of Military Polity: also the writings of Clausewitz, Dupin, Lloyd, Charbray, Tranchant d
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 7: sea-coast defences..—Brief description of our maritime fortifications, with an Examination of the several Contests that have taken place between ships and forts, including the attack on San Juan d'ulloa, and on St. Jean d'acre (search)
h himself says, that had he remained before Constantinople much longer — till the forts had been completely put in order — no return would have been open to him, and the unavoidable sacrifice of the squadron must have been the consequence. Scarcely had the fleet cleared the Straits, before it (the fleet) was reinforced with eight sail of the line; but, even with this vast increase of strength, the English did not venture to renew the contest. They had effected a most fortunate escape. General Jomini says that if the defence had been conducted by a more enter-prising and experienced people, the expedition would have cost the English their whole squadron. Great as was the damage done to the fleet, the forts themselves were uninjured. The English say their own fire did no execution, the shot in all probability not even strikng their objects--the rapid change of position, occasioned by a fair wind and current, preventing the certainty of aim. The state of the batteries when the fle
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 8: our northern frontier defences.—Brief description of the fortifications on the frontier, and an analysis of our northern campaigns. (search)
hat have been proposed for arranging these defensive works. Let us now apply this discussion to our northern frontier. The principle laid down by Napoleon and Jomini, that fortifications should always be constructed on important strategic points, is undoubtedly the correct one: but how to determine these points is a question triage-road, through the valley of the Chaudiere. Here is only a single road, but little travelled, and penetrating a wide and almost uninhabited wilderness. General Jomini says emphatically, that a line of operations should always offer two or three roads for the movement of an army in the sphere of its enterprises,--an insuperaf no foreign engineer who has recommended less than three lines of fortifications for the security of a land frontier; and Napoleon, the Archduke Charles, and General Jomini, agree in recommending at least this number of lines. There may be circumstances that render it unnecessary to resort to a three-fold defence throughout the
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 9: army organization—Staff and Administrative Corps.—Their history, duties, numbers, and organization (search)
the former till the close of the campaign of 1814, and the latter in the Waterloo campaign. General Jomini first greatly distinguished himself as chief of Ney's staff, and afterwards on the staff of or the present, and recur to the general discussion of staff duties. The following remarks of Jomini on the importance of the staff of an army are worthy of attention. A good staff, says he, from the corps of the army. A combination of the two systems is preferred by the best judges. Jomini recommends a regular staff-corps, with special schools for its instruction; but thinks that its those of Grimoard, Thiebault, Boutourlin, Labaume, are esteemed among the best. The writings of Jomini, Napoleon, Rocquancourt, Vauchclle, Odier, Scharnhorst, also contain much valuable information ode-Menmoire des officers generaux et superieurs et des capitaines. Precis de l'art de la guerre. Jomini. Memoires de Napoleon. Moetholon et Gourgaud. Cours élementaire d'art et d'histoire militaires.
competent knowledge of the duties connected with the two arms of service mentioned in this chapter, the officer should make himself thoroughly acquainted with Scott's System of Infantry Tactics, for the United States' Infantry, or at least with Major Cooper's abridged edition of Infantry Tactics, and with the system of Cavalry Tactics, adopted in our army; also with the directions for the use of these two arms in a campaign, and their employment on the battle-field, given in the writings of Jomini, Decker, Okouneff, Rocquancourt, and Jacquinot de Presle The following books may be referred to for further, information respecting the history, organization, use, and instruction of infantry and cavalry : Essai general de tactique. Guibert. Considerations generales sur l'infanterie francaise, par un general en retraite. A work of merit. De l'infanterie, par l'auteur de l'histoire de l'expedition de Russie. Histoire de la guerre de la peninsule. Foy. This work contains many interestin
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 11: army organization.—Artillery.—Its history and organization, with a brief Notice of the different kinds of Ordnance, the Manufacture of Projectiles, &c. (search)
out two-thirds of the cavalry, or one-seventh of the infantry. To qualify himself for the duties connected with his arm of service, the artillery officer must make himself thoroughly acquainted with-- The instruction for United States field artillery, horse and foot; Capt. Anderson's instruction for garrison artillery ; Kinsley's Notes on Pyrotechny; Knowlton's Notes on Gunpowder, &c. ; and The writings of Thiroux and Piobert on theoretical and practical instruction, and the writings of Jomini, Decker, aind Okouneff, on the use of this arm on the field of battle. The following list of books of reference may be of use to those who wish to make themselves perfectly familiar with all the branches of artillery. Histoire general de l'artillerie. Brunet. L'artillerie à cheval dans les combats de cavalerie. Par mi officier de l'artillerie Prussienne. Considerations et experiences sur le tir des obus à balles. Bormann. Essai sur les obusiers. Dusaert. Essai sur l'organisation de l'arti
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