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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 898 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 893 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 560 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 559 93 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 470 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 439 1 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 410 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 311 309 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 289 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 278 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley). You can also browse the collection for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 17 results in 10 document sections:

Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), A private Battery. (search)
A private Battery. We find the following paragraph in the Charleston (S. C.) correspondence of a contemporary: A salute was fired this afternoon by Captain James W. Meridith's private battery in honor of the ratification of the Constitution by South Carolina, and the hoisting of the Confederate States flag. Well, in the rapid onset of nineteenth century civilization, beautifully bewritten and philosophized as it has been, Charleston does outrun New York. There are a hundred things Charleston does outrun New York. There are a hundred things which are handy to have in the house. Mr. Toodles knew it; Mrs. Toodles knew it; we all know it. But do ever the most prudent of us think of providing, keeping, maintaining, casting mounting, loading, priming and discharging a private battery? There were private fortifications, as we have been informed, in the Middle Ages. There were certain counterscarps, ravelins and moats in My Uncle Toby's garden, which might be generically classed under the head of Private Battery. Burglars go about wit
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Wise Convalescent. (search)
ov. Wise, he was in the hands of his medical man taking his pills and potions with a perseverance and a punctuality which seems to have been rewarded; for his Excellency is now clothed at least, if not in his right mind, and is making speeches with all that lunatic force which has always, in the day of his bodily health and strength, characterized his frenzied eloquence. He took the field in his finest fulgurant style at Richmond, Va., on the 1st inst. though it is only lately through The Charleston (S. C.) Courier that he reaches us in red-hot report. He followed Jeferson Davis, and in the matter of fuss and fire, he floored that official completely. In pure, unmitigtatd and sublimely inventive mendacity, we are inclined to think that Mr. Davis can give the Virginian any odds, and then vanquish him; but in the beautiful art of saying nothing and of seeming to say a great deal, Wise is still unsurpassed, nay, unapproached by any mortal. In this speech, he is especially sanguinary;
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Slave-Holder's honor. (search)
by the Rebels, his letters being altered, and in some cases not sent at all. Had this fact come sooner to the knowledge of Mr. Russell, it would, we fear, have diminished his relish for that celebrated bottle of Old Madeira which he drank near Charleston, and his appetite for the excellent official dinners eaten by him in Montgomery. If anything could diminish the self-satisfaction of The Thunderer, we should think it would be the publication of the fact that, for so many weeks, and upon such l be met coldly, and as frigidly informed that the terms are cash. Repudiation will then be found to have been a most costly luxury, and it is pretty certain that a man who cannot command credit in New York would be as badly off in Richmond or Charleston, although these cities should become flourishing marts. The taint of the swindler will stick to him, and those who now applaud will be the last to trust him. Trade is based upon private honor, and there is not a market in the world which will
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Northern Independence. (search)
on of any measure which may merely postpone the final adjustment of this quarrel, and leave us, mean-while, certainly for more than one generation, the sport of political chances. If there be any philanthropist who shrinks, as well he may, from the butchery of battle, we warn him that the longest war, however bloody, is better for humanity than the smoothest of hollow truces. Do not let us be-deceived! There is no safety for this republic but in its integrity; there is no peace for it but in its indivisibility; there is no economy ill ending one war only that we may begin another; there is no happiness for us, there is none for our children, save in the complete victory of our Government. Five years of war would be better-yes, fifty years of war would be better than a century of imaginary peace and continual collisions. The time to acknowledge the Confederacy, if at all, was when Anderson pulled down the flag of Fort Sumter. That time has gone by forever! September 12, 1862.
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Union for the Union. (search)
Union for the Union. who could have thought that Northern Doughfaces had so much life in them?--that they would survive the bombardment of Fort Sumter?--that they would at last turn upon the Constitution, which they had professed to adore, and be ready to surrender the Union which they had pretended to reverence? Brooks & Co. are like Garrison, without Garrison's virtues and good conscience. We thought the Senate chamber purged of plantation insolence, and the well-weaponed Saulsbury starts up to convince us of our mistake — Saulsbury the Disunionist. We can imagine some rebellions Abraham — the Patriarch of Slavery, as Voltaire was the Patriarch of Infidelity — we see him reading his Northern newspaper, and grinning gloriously over his grog, as he peruses the Pro-Slavery journal! Nobody will mark more keenly than the Confederate observer, the opposition to the Administration which has been gathered by the concretion of all the dusty particles of a commercial self-interest.<
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Mr. B. Wood's Utopia. (search)
By a parity of reason, when we are so unfortunate as to encounter defeat and disaster, we suppose that he rejoices exceedingly. We have fondly thought that the success of the Federal arms would bring back peace and prosperity, but our prophetic member, his visual orbs being beautifully purged, is convinced that nothing more ruinous could happen to us than the most refulgent triumphs. He dreads in the recesses of his soul, the destruction of the resisting powers of the South. We may take Charleston. That would be a resisting power. Everybody else in these parts would be glad, but Benjamin is sorry. There is one chance the less of a contented household. Vicksburg may be reduced. More misery! Really, under such circumstances, one would, as a matter of curiosity, like to have Benjamin's estimate of the moral, political, and religious effect of the Battle of Bull Run! With his views he should consider it a blessing to this community. Thinking as he does, he should go down every n
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Mr. Buxton Scared. (search)
their imbecile and impoverished masters, than to cut their throats. But whether from Emancipation come evil or come good, peace or the sword, it is inevitable. The Ruler of the Universe, weary of our wicked and interminable delays, appears in righteous indignation to have taken the work out of our trembling and ignoble hands; or rather, he has, by the force of events, compelled us, even for the sake of self, to do justice to the outraged and oppressed. The first gun which was fired at Charleston announced to the world the demise of American Slavery. Already the diplomatic representatives of the Rebels are seeking to propitiate the Anti-Slavery sentiment of Europe, by promises of emancipation — by admissions that Slavery is neither profitable nor desirable in any way — by a loose talk of manumission when it shall be safe. Should their independence ever be acknowledged by the political powers of the world they will be reminded of these words; and in any event, the chances of an in
Charleston Cozy. if we may credit the epistle-monger in Charleston, who writes with a kind of rosy rapture to The London Times, that city, so far from partaking ong conversation with the Doctor. It is quite different with the chiefs of Charleston and their families whether blanc, black or yellow. They have all the titillars to bestain their linen cheeks at the thought of all the misery which their Charleston friends were encountering, can dam the sluices of their grief or weep for some less-favored Man-Owners. Charleston is, if we may believe this correspondent, far better off than she was when in a death-grapple with the pestilence, or after a dfeelings of the amiable donors. Meantime the content being so measureless in Charleston, we wonder if the Palmettoes ever think of the quite opposite condition of thpublic men — in the recklessness of a little knot of pestilent politicians in Charleston and the adjacent demesnes — in the teachings of such apostles as Calhoun and
he was esteemed a tolerable soldier in his day ; and Napoleon, at St. Helena, regretted he did not do it in Russia ; the English did it during our Revolutionary War; but we have never read that Washington threatened to hang English prisoners upon that account. The general who should refuse the services of half, or more than half, of the population of a country which he was endeavoring to subjugate, would not deserve a court-martial merely, because he would deserve to be shot without one. It is all very well for this Charleston editor, in the security of his sanctum, to howl for hempen vengeance; but Davis, who sorely needs the good opinion of the world, which may not prove very apt at discriminating between White and Black Regiments, will hardly consent to place his new Republic in a position of unnecessary ignominy. The natural scorn with which he must inevitably be regarded by all good Christians is, in all conscience, enough for even a Slaveholder's stomach. March 28, 1863.
bbot25 Ludovico, Father54 Lincoln, Abraham181, 384 Letcher, Governor340 Mason, John Y13, 24 Mitchel, John20, 50 Matthews, of Virginia, on Education92 Montgomery, The Muddle at181 Morse, Samuel and Sidney186 Meredith, J. W., his Private Battery141 McMahon, T. W., his Pamphlet214 Monroe, Mayor, of New Orleans234 Malcolm, Dr., on Slavery248 Maryland, The Union Party in260 Mallory, Secretary280 McClellan, General, as a Pacificator370 Mercury, The Charleston399 Netherlands, Deacon17 North, Southern Notions of the144 Olivieri, The Abbe, on Negro Education56 Pierce, Franklin29 Pollard, Mr., his Mammy 63 Palfrey, General, in Boston73 Perham, Josiah, his Invitation97 Parker, E. G., his Life of Choate108 Patents Granted in the South134 Polk, Bishop172 Parties, Extemporizing242 Platform Novelties in Boston247 Paley, Dr., on Slavery808 Pitt, William, an Abolitionist329 Rogersville, the Great Flogging in16