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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,126 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 528 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 402 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 296 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 246 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 230 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 214 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 180 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 174 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 170 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) or search for North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 2: bombardment and fall of Fort Sumter.--destruction of the Norfolk Navy Yard by the Federal officers. (search)
onsequence of their past acts of rebellion, which caused the destruction of the most important naval station in the United States. The greatest misfortune to the Union caused by the destruction of the Navy Yard, was the loss of at least twelve hundred fine guns, most of which were uninjured. A number of them were quickly mounted at Sewell's Point to keep our ships from approaching Norfolk; others were sent to Hatteras Inlet, Ocracocke, Roanoke Island and other points in the sounds of North Carolina. Fifty-three of them were mounted at Port Royal, others at Fernandina and at the defences of New Orleans. They were met with at Fort Henry, Fort Donelson, Island No.10, Memphis, Vicksburg, Grand Gulf and Port Hudson. We found them up the Red River as far as the gunboats penetrated, and took possession of some of them on the cars at Duvall's Bluff, on White River, bound for Little Rock. They gave us a three hours hard fight at Arkansas Post, but in the end they all returned to their ri
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 5: capture of the works at Hatteras Inlet by Flag officer Stringham.--destruction of the privateer Judah. (search)
. a board of eminent civilians and naval officers convened. the Sounds of North Carolina their defences, etc. Hatteras Inlet. a squadron fitted out to capture Hanists had appreciated the necessity of securing possession of the Sounds of North Carolina and defending their approaches against our gunboats. There is in this regist, 1861, the day after leaving Hampton Roads, the squadron The sounds of North Carolina. anchored off Hatteras Island, on the extreme southwestern point of which wg Officer Samuel Barron, C. S. N., commanding naval defences of Virginia and N. Carolina, Col. Martin, 7th Reg., N. C. Infantry, and Col. Andrews, commanding Forts H, as it gave us a foothold on Southern soil and possession of the Sounds of North Carolina, if we chose to occupy them. It was a death-blow to blockade running in thantity of munitions of war. The closing of these inlets to the Sounds of North Carolina sent the blockade runners elsewhere to find entrance to Southern markets, b
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 6: naval expedition against Port Royal and capture of that place. (search)
ed engineer, James B. Eads, who planned and built that class of iron-clads known on the Mississippi as turtle backs, which gave such a good account of themselves during the war,and fought their way through many a bloody encounter, from Fort Henry to Grand Gulf, Port Hudson and the Red River. After the capture of Fort Hatteras, Commodore Stringham was relieved of the command at his own request. Two squadrons were organized on the Atlantic coast, one to guard the shores of Virginia and North Carolina under Flag Officer L. M. Golds-borough; the Southern Squadron. extending from South Carolina to the Capes of Florida, was assigned to Flag Officer S. F. Dupont, and the Gulf Squadron to Flag Officer W. W. McKean. Although the capture of the ports at Hatteras Inlet was an important achievement, yet it did not accomplish all the Navy Department aimed at. There was no entrance to the Sounds except for vessels of very light draft of water, and there was no harbor in the vicinity wher
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 11: Goldsborough's expedition to the sounds of North Carolina. (search)
Goldsborough's expedition to the sounds of North Carolina. Expedition to Roanoke Island. RThe principal entrances into the sounds of North Carolina were secured, but the Confederates had stinment had established a formidable army in North Carolina in the neighborhood of Plymouth, Greenvills directed towards some of these points in North Carolina, and it was not long after this that Lee srks and their garrisons, all the sounds of North Carolina came under Federal jurisdiction, as the naons were started all through the Sounds of North Carolina for the purpose of destroying the enemy's t quarter. Before leaving the Sounds of North Carolina, we cannot but express our unqualified adm certain rivers leading into the Sounds of North Carolina, in order to ascertain whether the enemy wollow other adventures. All the sounds of North Carolina and the rivers emptying into them as far uin the hands of the Federal Government. North Carolina was no longer a base of supplies for the C[2 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 12: fight between the Merrimac and Monitor, March 8, 1862. (search)
er 12: fight between the Merrimac and Monitor, March 8, 1862. Appearance of the Merrimac. destruction of the Congress and Cumberland. arrival of the Monitor. the fight. While the Federal arms were so successful in the sounds of North Carolina, a great disaster overtook the Federal cause in Hampton Roads, filling the country with dismay, and even bringing many of the Union people to doubt the success of the cause for which they had labored so hard. When the Union naval officers writer was of a different opinion and wrote at once to Mr. Fox, Assistant Secretary of the Navy, urging him to hurry up the Monitor; but no one in the squadron seemed to anticipate any danger. Rear Admiral Goldsborough was in the sounds of North Carolina and could easily have left what was there to be done to the skill of the gallant Rowan, but he evidently apprehended no danger from the Merrimac or he would have returned at once to Hampton Roads. One would have thought that the Federals coul
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 16: operations on the Mississippi. (search)
s the Tennessee River and joins the railroad leading to Nashville; showing that the Confederates were making every exertion to hold on to Tennessee, which was to them the most important of all the States, except, perhaps, Virginia; since it was wedged in between five secession States: and the Confederates, while they held it, could keep the Federal troops from advancing South. Should the latter obtain possession they would control Northern Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia, with parts of North Carolina and Virginia. With the Cumberland and the Tennessee Rivers, and all the railroads in the Union possession, the rebellion would have been Commander James W. Shirk. confined to the other States, and the resources of Tennessee would have been lost to the Confederate cause. It would have been better to have thrown three hundred thousand men at once into Tennessee and crushed the rebellion there, instead of losing a greater number in the end and prolonging the war for four years. On th
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 22: operations in the Potomac.--destruction of Confederate batteries.--losses by shipwreck, in battle, etc. (search)
Total 264 2,557 218.016 Present naval force. Description. Number. Guns. Tons. Old Navy 74 1,691 100,008 Purchased vessels 180 688 86,910 Transferred from War and Treasury Departments 50 230 32,828 New vessels, completed and under construction 123 659 3120,290 Total 427 3,268 340,036 Increase since last reported 163 711 122,020 Losses by shipwreck and in battle. Name. Class. Guns. Tonnage Remarks. R. B. Forbes Steamer. 3 329 Wrecked Feb., 1862, coast of North Carolina. Congress Frigate. 50 1,867 In action with Merrimac, March 8, 1862. Cumberland Sloop. 24 1,726 do. Whitehall Steamer. 4 323 At Old Point, March 9, 1862, by fire. M. J. Carlton Mortar Schooner 3 178 Attack on Forts Jackson and St. Philip, April 19, 1862. Varuna Steamer. 9 1,300 In action with confederate gun-boats below New Orleans, April 24, 1862. Sidney C. Jones. Mortar schooner 3 245 Grounded below Vicksburg and burned to prevent falling into the hands of the enemy.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 34: (search)
erations of Flag-officer Goldsborough in the sounds of North Carolina. importance of gun-boats in co-operating expeditions aving Commander S. C. Rowan in charge of the sounds of North Carolina. The gallant service performed by Commander Rowan, e manner in which the little flotilla in the sounds of North Carolina operated is worthy of all praise, and confers the highscontinue the narrative of operations in the sounds of North Carolina. As has been seen, there was scarcely a large gun lresident considered that his services in the sounds of North Carolina entitled him to a vote of thanks from Congress and senby the North Atlantic squadron except in the sounds of North Carolina. which for a time were under the control of Commanderaccount of the operations of the Navy in the sounds of North Carolina up to November 10th, 1862, at which time these waters in the hands of the Federals and part of the coast of North Carolina was under blockade. All of which, when closely exam
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
blockade-runners. operations in sounds of North Carolina. Confederates invest Washington, N. C., bon, beyond the operations in the sounds of North Carolina and the naval expedition under Commander Fy, to molest the citizens in the sounds of North Carolina, determined that no loyal feeling should e the enemy in his movements. The war in North Carolina was not prosecuted on a scale that could ahe troops, drive the enemy out of the State of North Carolina, tear up the railroads leading to Ric may have been said that the Federals held North Carolina, yet it was by a most precarious tenure; aealous efforts to obtain a firm footing in North Carolina, and the naval officer in command of the Save been taken in Virginia as was tried in North Carolina--small bodies of men detailed to hold promee reports the operations in the sounds of North Carolina. It appears that the Confederates had invunts of small expeditions in the sounds of North Carolina, the gun-boats being evidently constantly
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 38: review of the work done by the Navy in the year 1863. (search)
from the records. Acting-Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, in command of the North Atlantic squadron, ably seconded by the zeal of his officers, had penetrated the waters of Virginia wherever his gun-boats could reach, and had occupied the sounds of North Carolina to such an extent that the Confederates could be said to have no foothold in that quarter. Wilmington, near the mouth of the Cape Fear River, was really the only point in North Carolina where the enemy could boast that they had defied the FeNorth Carolina where the enemy could boast that they had defied the Federal arms, and this point was found extremely difficult to close owing to two separate entrances to the river some thirty miles apart, both protected by the heaviest description of land defences and obstructed by shallow bars. These obstacles at the time were considered such as to preclude any attempt to capture Wilmington from the sea. Many reasons existed why the Army could not co-operate in an attack upon Wilmington, which thus remained upwards of a year longer than it should have done t
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