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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 163 47 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 151 13 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 128 0 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 62 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 57 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 55 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 53 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 49 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment 40 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 37 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Jacksonville (Florida, United States) or search for Jacksonville (Florida, United States) in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 34: (search)
extricate themselves from a dilemma. notice of Lieutenant Cushing, his attack on the town of Jacksonville and his gallant defence of the Ellis. capture of Fort Macon by the Army and Navy. surrenderould enter New River Inlet, push up the river, sweep it clear of vessels, capture the town of Jacksonville or Onslow Courthouse, take the Wilmington mail and destroy any salt-works he could find on thturn and extinguish the flames, he proceeded on his way up the river. He reached the town of Jacksonville, landed, threw out pickets and placed guards over the public buildings. Jacksonville was tJacksonville was the county-seat of Onslow County, and quite an important place. Here he captured 25 stand of arms in the Court-house, and a large mail in the post-office. He also took two schooners and confiscated the negroes of the Confederate postmaster. Jacksonville being situated on the main road to Wilmington, it was not long before the news of Cushing's performances reached the latter place, and the Con
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
d with their heavy guns and bursting shells, and the Southerners were usually discomfited. General Gordon landed at Jacksonville on the 9th of May, and assumed command of the district of Florida; and, in view of the long line of river to be kept oal force employed in the St. John's River, under Commander Balch, was composed of the Pawnee, Mahaska and Norwich, off Jacksonville, and the Ottawa at Palatka. With such a small force it would have been impossible to prevent the enemy from practicin transport Maple-leaf offered another success for the Confederates, and was blown up by a torpedo, fifteen miles above Jacksonville — this being the highway to Palatka and above, where Federal troops were being constantly transported. The duty on th by the Army, as will appear by the following letter: Headquarters of Auxiliary Column To Gordon's Command, Jacksonville, Florida, June 3, 1864. Captain — It is a duty and pleasure to express through you to the officers and privates of your