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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 14 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 10 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 9 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 26, 1862., [Electronic resource] 7 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 6 2 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 5 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 9, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 4 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 4 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Redpath, The Roving Editor: or, Talks with Slaves in the Southern States.. You can also browse the collection for Barry or search for Barry in all documents.

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n their natural advancement. Separated by a river alone, they seem to have been purposely and providentially designed to exhibit in their future histories, the difference which naturally results from a country free, and a country afflicted with the curse of slavery. The same may be said of the two States of Missouri and Illinois. Surely this is satisfactory testimony? Thomas J. Randolph spoke next, and in the same strain as the preceding speakers. Is slavery a curse? Marshall, Barry, Randolph, Faulkner, and Chandler answer in the affirmative; and thus replies Mr. James McDowell, junior, the delegate from Rockbridge: Slavery a Leprosy. Sir, if our ancestors had exerted the firmness, which, under greater obligations we ourselves are called on to exert, Virginia would not, at this day, have been mourning over the legacy of weakness, and of sorrow that has been left her; she would not have been thrust down — down — in a still lowering relation to the subordinate post