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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 30 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 24 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 9 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 23 1 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 15 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 10 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 0 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 8 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 7 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Redpath, The Roving Editor: or, Talks with Slaves in the Southern States.. You can also browse the collection for Benton or search for Benton in all documents.

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or more, before my visit to it. A mild, kind, hospitable, law-abiding man: one would naturally think that he — the founder of the town, the richest of its citizens, and a slaveholder, albeit, who had never once uttered an abolition sentiment — would not only have escaped the enmity, but even the suspicion, of the border ruffians of the State. But he did not escape. He owned the press and office of the Parkville Luminary, a paper which supported the party, or the wing of the party, of which Benton was the peerless chief. In one number of the Luminary a paragraph appeared condemning the course of the invaders of Kansas. Enough! The press was destroyed and thrown into the river by a mob of pro-slavery ruffians. Col. Park also got notice to leave, and was compelled to fly for his life. I went over to Parkville from Kansas city, Missouri, to attend to some business there. I had previously made the acquaintance of several of its ruffian citizens. I rode into the town about one o'
a negro burned to death no chance of justice for negroes in courts of law against white men a Southern Gubernatorial confession of this fact slave breeding Col. Benton's statement refuted by statistics a Southern confession who hate negroes in the Southern States can the Southern staples be cultivated without slavery? prooice or humanity. I have felt constrained, in a majority of the cases brought to my notice, either to modify the sentence, or set it aside altogether. XII. Colonel Benton, in a lecture that he delivered in Boston, had the audacity to assert that slaves are seldom sold by their masters, excepting for debt or faults, or crimes. e commits a capital offence, he may be pardoned by being sold out of the State--the owner of him pocketing the proceeds of the auction? But statistics refute Colonel Benton's statement. It is capable of demonstration that twenty-five thousand negroes are annually sold from the Northern or slave-breeding to the Southern or slave-