hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 898 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 893 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 560 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 559 93 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 470 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 439 1 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 410 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 311 309 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 289 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 278 4 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in James Redpath, The Roving Editor: or, Talks with Slaves in the Southern States.. You can also browse the collection for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 21 results in 3 document sections:

n efficient means of saving grace, I love Charleston! I spent a fortnight there--one of the happ over and above all, that the Sugar House of Charleston, by some means, or at any cost, may speedilyof the majority of the slaves in the city of Charleston. Mr. Brooks was a nobody at that time. Bbut despondingly resigned to their fate. At Charleston I found them morose and savagely brooding ovhostile fleet was seen sailing up the bay of Charleston — then, as surely as God lives, would the sed voluntary sacrifice. The Sugar House of Charleston is a building erected for the purpose of punropped. I concluded my fourth letter from Charleston in these words: I have spent six days nowinsurrection. Having done my work, I left Charleston. Savannah. I spent three months at Savthe Commercial Convention which assembled in Charleston in 1854. I beg pardon of the chivalry! Iribune debate : I determined to remain in Charleston during the session of the Convention, to rep[3 more...]
fare to Savannah, where I intended to go; but a little trifle of that kind did not discourage me. I resolved to walk to Charleston; and, as I did not know a foot of the way, to follow the railroad track. I had no adequate conception of the nature ass, will appear to the reader more probable from the testimony of a pious colporteur, given before a public meeting in Charleston, in February, 1855. I quote from a Charleston paper's report. The colporteur had been stationed at----county, N. C. : remember my first entrance into the city of Augusta. The yellow fever was raging there, as? well as in the cities of Charleston and Savannah. Everybody was out of town! The nearer I approached Augusta, the more frequently was I asked, as I sto believe in them. And this cabin was haunted, you say? The cabin referred to stood on a lonely field westward of Charleston. It got that reputation for years, resumed my companion. Nobody would go near it, night nor day. On dark nights, pe
rmin who fester in the Five Points cellars, the North street saloons, or the dancing houses and levee of New Orleans or Charleston. Not so vile, however, as the rabble of the Platte Region, who distinguished themselves as the champions of the South to be a Southerner and a friend of their peculiar or sectional crime. The Southern Agriculturist, published at Charleston, South Carolina, thus faithfully describes this class of persons: Overseers are changed every year; a few remain four or fies. The preceding chapter will show how an earnest man can use this power. I remember an incident narrated to me at Charleston, which illustrates this point. In conversation upon various subjects with Col.----, a fine specimen of the Southern pla woman who lived with him as his wife. He had immediately decamped, and was supposed to have gone in the direction of Charleston. I was about returning to my home; and my friend, an active magistrate, proposed that we should endeavor to overtake t