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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 2 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 14 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 12 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 12 0 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 12 0 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 12 0 Browse Search
Charles A. Nelson , A. M., Waltham, past, present and its industries, with an historical sketch of Watertown from its settlement in 1630 to the incorporation of Waltham, January 15, 1739. 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 18, 1865., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves.. You can also browse the collection for Adam or search for Adam in all documents.

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William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves., Lecture III: objections considered. (search)
politically equal. The history of all human governments, throughout all time, shows this. To be hewers of wood and drawers of water, in unequal and subordinate positions, to the few, has been the lot of the great mass of mankind from the days of Adam. But, says the socialist, (to whom the doctrine is far more creditable,) this latter is precisely the state of things we deprecate, and affirm that such was never the intention of Deity, but that it is his will that there should be no such inequarst of Genesis, that God created man in his own image: in the image of God created he him : male and female created he them. The term man is, of course, to be understood in its generic sense, and all that is affirmed is, that God directly created Adam and Eve, and all their posterity seminally in them; and from whom, therefore, they have proceeded, as to both soul and body, by generation, and not by a separate act of creation by Jehovah. Now of these two created beings, one was placed in direc
William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves., Lecture V: the doctrines of rights applied to government. (search)
hould always have the sanction of the civil, government. But still they are entirely distinct, and should not be confounded, either in theory or in practice The one is secular, and the other is Divine. Now, we say that civil government — for of that we are called more particularly to speak--is a necessity of man's condition. It dates back as early as the creation of man. God himself established it in the law he gave to govern the first relation that existed on earth — the relation between Adam and his helpmeet. After the fall, a necessity arose which gave it a new and more important bearing. We soon see it ramifying itself through all society, and dealing with all the relations of life. Its necessity and authority, as a great means of controlling the lower nature of man, is among the permanent beliefs of mankind. Neither legislators nor philosophers originated these beliefs. They are among the intuitions of man. The common judgment of mankind is not more assured that man exi