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William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves., Lecture II: the abstract principle of the institution of domestic slavery. (search)
leasing to him; and therefore serve their masters with the same willing obedience, because therein they were serving the Lord. For these persons, we may suppose, were originally made slaves by subjection. They are exhorted to submit themselves not only to the particular commands of their masters, but also to their providential condition. The commands of their masters might be obeyed from mere prudential considerations. In this case, their obedience would be without the religious element. Paul exhorts them to religious obedience. Many, no doubt, obeyed: gave the consent of their wills, as they gave the assent of their understandings; and hence, cheerfully submitting to their providential condition as from the Lord, they obeyed their masters in singleness of heart as unto Christ. They submitted, as any other good man submits, with consent as well as assent to his providential condition, and goes forth to the duties of that condition with a cheerful heart. Their condition was ther
William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves., Lecture IV: the question of rights discussed. (search)
lly expressed — still we find that the sentiment of all mankind is on the side of virtue, on the side of the good; and that men, though unchanged by sovereign grace, are still required to be honest, gentlemanly, and in all things regardful of each other's rights. We admit of exceptions or modifications of this only in the case of those in whom humanity has not been fully developed, as before noticed, and those in civilized life who have so far abused their moral nature as, in the language of Paul, to fit themselves for destruction. Therefore, it still remains that the good in the form of rectitude, right, is in some modification an endowment of my nature: the right, in itself, is mine by nature. But the good, as an attribute, is an active principle. We were endowed with it for the purpose of movement — for results. It is my duty to act right--straight or in accordance with the good as a rule. Hence, whatever is a necessary condition of the operation of this active principle, th
William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves., Lecture V: the doctrines of rights applied to government. (search)
faculties of the mind, subject to the great law of habit; and if not checked, restrained according to the true idea of government, a habit of submission is formed, which, if not early dissolved, becomes a confirmed habit. The will, instead of being the governing power of the mind, becomes, in truth, the faculty governed. It has lost the power of self-control. It has become the slave of passion — confirmed in the habit of submission. It is precisely at this point of mental degradation that Paul declares of vessels of wrath, those who have brought themselves into this state by their own act, that they are fitted to destruction. Now, in view of these facts and the principles already established, what are the rights of man? First. In the state of infancy. It has been proved that the subjective endowments of humanity, and whatever is necessary to their existence and operation, are the natural right of man. That the undeveloped good is the endowment of this form of humanity will no
William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves., Lecture VI: the abstract principle of slavery discussed on Scripture grounds, and misrepresentations of the principle examined. (search)
either contracted to do so through his whole life, or who, by the usages of war, or by inheritance, or by purchase from another, was so bound to service--(such as Paul calls a servant under the yoke. 2 Tim. VI. 1.) These different relations are distinctly marked by the use of these terms in the Bible, and especially the meaning umstances, not a word is known to have escaped him, either in public or in private, declaring the relation of master and slave to be sinful! But, on the contrary, Paul's denunciation.--1 Tim. VI. 3--of the theachers of abolition doctrines, that they consent not to wholesome words, even the words of our Lord Jesus Christ, is suffiognized far more stringent forms of slavery than that of the African in this country, at any period of its history — this view of the system will find no support. Paul and Peter, who wrote with special allusion to slaves under these laws, so far from regarding this personality as lost and swallowed up in the humanity of the maste
William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves., Lecture X: emancipation doctrines discussed. (search)
plan it would operate to collect the slaves into a few States, cut them off from contact with civilization, and reduce them to barbarism it would make an opening for Northern farmers and their menials to come into those States from which they retired the modifications which the system of slavery has undergone within late years a comparison of the menials of the free and of the slave States, and the only plan of emancipation admissible the gospel the only remedy for the evils of slavery Paul's philosophy and practice, 1 Tim. VI. 1-5. immediate emancipation is the scheme of the abolitionists proper, whilst gradual emancipation is the favorite plan of the anti-slavery party, The ground we should take is this, that no plan of emancipation, either immediate or gradual, is adapted to the present moral condition and relative circumstances of our African population. Nothing of the kind could at this time be attended with good, but only with evil. I limit this discussion to the su
William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves., Lecture XII: the conservative influence of the African population of the South. (search)
f liberty is crushed and trodden under foot by the man of sin. Education and the genius of liberty have done much in Europe, and are daily struggling against fearful odds; and may do much more in this country to modify and restrain this power, but they are impotent to its destruction. It is, in itself, so entirely contradictory of all liberty, and at the same time so full of vitality, that God in mercy has only relieved the despair of the world by the assurance that he would destroy it. Thus Paul says: The man of sin, who opposeth and exalteth himself above all that is called God, or that is worshipped; so that he, as God, sitteth in the temple of God, showing himself that he is God--whom the Lord shall Consume with the spirit of his Mouth, and shall destroy with the Brightness of his coming. 2 Thess. II. 1-12. The world has no hope of relief from the oppression of this nightmare of superstition, but that which is found in this promise of God, that the word of his truth shall overth
William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves., Lecture XIII: the duty of masters to slaves. (search)
ged in company, and degraded by harsh epithets for his stupidity and disobedience by those whom he thinks to be superior in every thing, to grow up with the necessary self-respect, is not to be expected. It would be singular, indeed, even if one who had been better brought up should be able to retain his self-respect under this kind of treatment. And without self-respect, punishment can have no moral effect. Why then should we thus sin against God? How much better to regard the counsel of Paul: And ye masters, do the same things unto them, forbearing threatening: knowing that your Master also is in heaven. Ephesians VI. 9. He hath enjoined upon servants to serve their masters in singleness of heart as unto Christ, with good will doing service as to the Lord, and not to men. Masters are then commanded to do the same things unto them, forbearing threatening; that is, carefully avoiding all those hasty, unjust, and petulant censures, which display themselves in idle threatenings, o