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William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves. 19 19 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 10 10 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 8 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 6 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 8, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 1, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 21, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves.. You can also browse the collection for Wayland or search for Wayland in all documents.

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William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves., Lecture II: the abstract principle of the institution of domestic slavery. (search)
on, after all, of a no less distinguished abolitionist and literary man than Dr. Wayland, the author of your text. On the subject of the mode in which the objects ot a government over a people, in the moral and social condition described by Dr. Wayland, which relied upon moral restraint, that is, upon the principle of self-cont is, the highest conceivable form or system of slavery. Now this is said, by Dr. Wayland, after waging a relentless war against both the principle and practice of sln spite of him, give it both being and activity? Why need one so learned as Dr. Wayland allow the truth to escape his notice, because in one connection it wears the To proceed: History informs us of many such communities as those defined by Dr. Wayland, to which any other form of government would be entirely inappropriate but td to the operation of the same general principle by the State. And to adopt Dr. Wayland's own language on this point — suicidal as it is to him — we add, in regard
William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves., Lecture III: objections considered. (search)
re are free and equal and the particular form in which Dr. Wayland expresses the popular idea, viz., the relation in which quality of condition, but equality of right remarks on Dr. Wayland's course his treatise on moral Science as a text-book. ion, but equality of right. This is the form in which Dr. Wayland prefers to express the doctrine of equality. Moral Scither direction. For brutes, in a sense well defined by Dr. Wayland himself, have rights. No one but a moral brute would de any proper sense, unless our advantages be equal. Now, Dr. Wayland himself allows, in the very terms of his proposition, thdomestic slavery! We are not surprised, therefore, that Dr. Wayland found himself compelled to admit that minors were exceptivil freedom? How shall we characterize the course of Dr. Wayland! After drawing an ingenious argument through many pagesn points of very simple application in Moral Science. Dr. Wayland's treatise is a text-book in many of our literary instit
William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves., Lecture VI: the abstract principle of slavery discussed on Scripture grounds, and misrepresentations of the principle examined. (search)
ned according to the Scriptures the abstract principle of slavery sanctioned by the Scriptures the Roman government Dr. Wayland's Scripture argument examined and refuted the positions of Dr. Channing and Prof. Whewell examined and refuted. thxtreme form of controlling the wills of men, to be his appointment, God establishes the principle, as in itself right. Dr. Wayland, however, (see article, Modes in which Personal Liberty may be violated,) affirms, that the gospel is diametrically opright in them, not to grant them release would certainly be a denial of their just rights! Is this the sense in which Dr. Wayland would have us understand the Saviour of mankind? Certain it is, that this is the only sense in which his words can bef their humanity merely, we have proved; and whether they are so or not, by acquirement, is a practical question which Dr. Wayland allows that he is not competent to decide. This question will be met in another place. It is sufficient here to stat
William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves., Lecture XI: teaching the slaves to read and Write. (search)
only at this point that they challenge public sympathy. For the mind was never before sufficiently free to make their situation an oppressive one, assuming that their rulers do not abuse their power. Before this period, their rights lay in being governed — not in governing. Political freedom would be as dangerous intrusted to them, as a razor would be in the hands of a child, and should, for the same general reasons, be withheld from them. But withheld by whom? asks the philosophy of Dr. Wayland. I answer, By those who have the intelligence to do it. Both the principle of benevolence and the law of reciprocity require this; and that intelligence which imposes this duty, can never fail to supply the means for the restraint of brute force. Of the truth of this general position no people appear to be more sensible than the aristocracy of Europe. De Tocqueville clearly asserts this on their behalf, when he states that the object of his tour through the United States arose from t