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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 206 0 Browse Search
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 156 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 114 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 80 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 64 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 56 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 36 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William A. Crafts, Life of Ulysses S. Grant: His Boyhood, Campaigns, and Services, Military and Civil.. You can also browse the collection for Five Forks (Virginia, United States) or search for Five Forks (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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he Potomac, south of Petersburg, and between Lee and Johnston, only waited for his orders to commence the battle, or series of battles, which should overthrow the hard-pressed rebel Confederacy. His manoeuvres secured the chief battle-field of his own selection. His orders: massed the troops where he wanted to strike the heaviest blows. His sagacity selected the gallant Sheridan to lead the boldest movements and the hardest fighting. His keen vision saw the key to the rebel position at Five Forks, and his persistency pressed his heavy columns upon it till it was carried, and Lee sent his message of dismay to the trembling traitors at Richmond. His strategy had. practically surrounded the rebel armies, and his tactics forced Lee to retreat by a line north of the Appomattox, on a route chosen by himself. Jeff Davis and his confederate traitors of the rebel government fled precipitately from Richmond, and Lee's army evacuated that city and Petersburg, utterly defeated and demorali
g themselves. It was his discernment which selected each to take that command, and to perform those deeds, for which he was best adapted. His most brilliant subordinates, Sherman and Sheridan, were especially thus indebted to him. Sherman was looked upon as little better than a lunatic till Grant gave direction to his abilities, and Sheridan achieved no distinction till Grant, seeing his true capacity, made him his cavalry commander, and sent him to the Shenandoah to defeat Early, and to Five Forks to break through Lee's lines. Thomas, McPherson, and others, were in like manner indebted to Grant for promotion and opportunities; and each of them was trusted and assigned to difficult duties, because of his intuitive knowledge of their ability and fitness for the work demanded of them. So, also, his staff has always been composed of men admirably qualified for their respective duties, and who performed them with the same quiet energy which characterized their chief. This power to dis