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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 14 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 10 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 9 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 26, 1862., [Electronic resource] 7 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 6 2 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 5 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 9, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 4 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 4 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Barry or search for Barry in all documents.

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inion, it becomes our duty to withdraw from this Convention. We beg, Sir, to communicate this fact through you, and to assure the Convention that we do so in no spirit of anger, but under a sense of imperative obligation, properly appreciating its responsibilities and cheerfully submitting to its consequences. The Alabama delegation, which included ex-Gov. John A. Winston, Wm. L. Yancey, Reuben Chapman, ex-M. C., and other prominent citizens, thereupon withdrew from the Convention. Mr. Barry, of Mississippi, next announced the withdrawal of the entire Mississippi delegation. Mr. Glenn, of Mississippi, stated the grounds of such withdrawal, as follows: Sir, at Cincinnati we adopted a Platform on which we all agreed. Now answer me, ye men of the North, of the East, of the South, and of the West, what was the construction placed upon that Platform in different sections of the Union? You at the West said it meant one thing; we of the South said it meant another. Either we
unsustained by facts. For between the panic-stricken fugitives and the victors were not merely the reserve (5th) division, which remained in position, and had not fired a shot, but the 1st (Tyler's) division forming our left, which had suffered little loss, but had signally repulsed the demonstration made upon it at the close of the fight; while the better portion of our beaten right and center, including the regular infantry and cavalry, still stood its ground and sternly faced the foe. Maj. Barry, our Chief of Artillery in the battle, in his official report, after noticing the loss of ten of his guns at the close, through the flight of their supporting infantry, says: The army having retired upon Centerville, I was ordered by Gen. McDowell in person, to p<*>st the artillery in position to cover the retreat. The batteries of Hunt, Ayres, Tidball, Edwards, Green, and the New-York 8th regiment, (the latter served by volunteers from Wilcox's brigade,) 20 pieces in all, were at
R. W., of S. C., a Commissioner to Washington, 411. Barringer, Daniel M., of N. C., in the Peace Conference, 401. Barron, Com. S., surrenders at Hatteras, 600. Barrow, Washington, Commissioner to the Confederacy from Gov. Harris. 482. Barry, Major, on the battle of Bull Run, 545. Barry, Mr., of Miss., withdraws from the Dem. Convention at Charleston, 314. Bartow, Gen., killed at Bull Run, 543; 545. Bates, Edward, of Mo., 247; in the Chicago Convention, 321; in President LinBarry, Mr., of Miss., withdraws from the Dem. Convention at Charleston, 314. Bartow, Gen., killed at Bull Run, 543; 545. Bates, Edward, of Mo., 247; in the Chicago Convention, 321; in President Lincoln's Cabinet, 423. Baton Rouge, La., Arsenal seized at, 412; 490. Bayard, James A., (father,) 107. Bayard, James A., (son,) 315; presides at the Seceders' Convention, 317, on Secession, 350; 437; 562. Beaufort, S. C., captured by Federals, 605. Beauregard, Gen. G. P. T., 442; demands the surrender of Fort Sumter, 443; proclamation by, 534; commands the Rebels at Bull Run, 539; his official report, 541 to 546; 551. Beckwith, Major, at Lexington, Mo., 588. Bedford, Pa., fug