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Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 155 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 26 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 20 4 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 19 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 17 1 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 16 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. 16 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 15 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 14 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Lydia Maria Child or search for Lydia Maria Child in all documents.

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y some of them that I have induced them to join me. But the contrary is true. I do not say this to injure them, but as regretting their weakness. There is not one of them but joined me of his own accord, and the greater part at their own expense. A number of them I never saw, and never had a word of conversation with, till the day they came to me, and that was for the purpose I have stated. Now I have done. Among the many letters addressed to him while in prison was one from Lydia Maria Child, who sought, but did not obtain, from the Virginia authorities, permission to visit him in his prison. Her letter to Brown was answered as follows: Mrs. L. Maria child: My dear Friend (such you prove to be, though a stranger):--Your most kind letter has reached me, with the kind offer to come here and take care of me. Allow me to express my gratitude for your great sympathy, and at the same to propose to you a different course, together with my reasons for wishing it. I shoul
4. Brown, Gov. Joseph E., of Ga., speech at Convention, 337; his Message, urging Secession, 347. Brown, John, at the battle of Black Jack, 244; 279; his early life, 280 to 282; what Redpath says of him, 282-3; at the battle of Osawatomie, 284; his speech at Lawrence, 284-5; he releases a number of slaves, 286: battle of the spurs, 286; goes to Canada; his Constitution, 287-8; goes to Harper's Ferry, 289; captures the Arsenal, 290-91; the fight, 292-3; his capture, 294-5; letter to L. Maria Child, 295; letter to his family, 296; letter to Mr. Humphrey, 297; his execution, 298-9; Congressional, 305. Brown, Mayor, of Baltimore, 461; harangues the mob, 464; sends envoys to the President; his correspondence with Gov. Andrew, 465-6; his interview with the President, 466. Brown, Milton, of Tenn., 171. Brown, Oliver, killed at Harper's Ferry, 292. Brown, Owen, son of John Brown, 288; escapes from Harper's Ferry, 299. Brown, Watson, killed at Harper's Ferry, 291. Browne