hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 65 65 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 64 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 63 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 59 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 57 3 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 55 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 51 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 43 1 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 36 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 3 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Frederick, Md. (Maryland, United States) or search for Frederick, Md. (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 4 document sections:

ployed in the work of capturing several alleged fugitives, finally met a white man on the highway, presented a pistol, and arrested him as a runaway slave, for whom a reward of $200 had been offered. The white man happened, however, to be acquainted in Edwardsville, and was thus enabled to establish his right to himself. The business of slave-hunting became so profitable that the sheriff of Montreal, Canada, received, in January, 1855, a letter from a police officer and constable, in Frederick, Md., making him this tempting proposition: Vast numbers of slaves, says the Frederick official, escaping from their masters or owners, succeed in reaching your Provinces, and are, therefore, without the pale of the Fugitive Slave law, and can only be restored by cunning, together with skill. Large rewards are offered, and will be paid, for their return; and, could I find an efficient person to act with me, a great deal of money could be made, as I would equally divide. * * * The only ap
American continent, and had quietly arrested and imprisoned all the members of Congress and Judges of the Supreme Court, by way of strengthening his usurpation, would not have seemed more essentially incredible, nor have aroused a more intense excitement. Here follow the dispatches which gave the first tidings of this audacious and amazing demonstration: Insurrection at Harper's Ferry!To the Associated Press: Baltimore, Monday, Oct. 17, 1859. A dispatch just received here from Frederick, and dated this morning, states that an insurrection has broken out at Harper's Ferry, where an armed band of Abolitionists have full possession of the Government Arsenal. The express train going east was twice fired into, and one of the railroad hands and a negro killed, while they were endeavoring to get the train through the town. The insurrectionists stopped and arrested two men, who had come to town with a load of wheat, and, seizing their wagon, loaded it with rifles, and sent them
ved, to enable the master-spirits to dispatch to their confederates in Western Maryland such messages as this to one at Frederick, who soon after joined the Confederate army: To Bradley T. Johnson, Esq.: Thank you for your offer. Bring you The Legislature of Maryland convened in extra session, in accordance with Gov. Hicks's call, not at Annapolis, but at Frederick — far from any Union force, but within easy striking distance of the Confederates at Harper's Ferry. Gov. Hicks, in hisin all that major portion of the State lying north and west of Baltimore. A Home Guard of Unionists was organized in Frederick, comprising her most substantial citizens. A great Union meeting was held in Baltimore on the evening of May 4th; wherapolis Junction to the Relay House, nine miles from Baltimore, and controlling the communications between that city and Frederick. On the 9th, a force of 1,300 men from Perryville debarked at Locust Point, Baltimore, under cover of the guns of the
Col., (Union,) at Chicamicomico, 600. Brown, Col. Harvey, at Fort Pickens, 601. Brown, David Paul, 126. Brown, Frederick, killed by Martin White, 284. Brown, Gov. Joseph E., of Ga., speech at Convention, 337; his Message, urging Secessiohairman of Committee on Indiana Territory memorials for Slavery, 53. Franklin, T. E., in Peace Conference, 401. Frederick, Md., a constable at, makes an offer to the sheriff of Montreal, 218; the Legislature convenes at, 470; a Union Home Guardglas Convention, 318; 849; population in 1860, 351; 461; 468; Butler lands at Annapolis, 468-9; Legislature convenes at Frederick, 470; decides not to secede, etc., 471; 471-2; loyal at last, 472; 555. See Baltimore. Marysville, Kansas, frauduleOstend, etc. Sprague, Gov. Wm., of R. I., 326; 469; 552. Squatter Sovereign, The, citation from, 237. Stanton, Frederick P., Sec'y of Kansas, 249. Staunton Spectator, The, 478. Star of the West, The, attempts to relieve Sumter, 412; s