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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 31 7 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 17 1 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 14 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 13 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 12 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 11 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Corse or search for Corse in all documents.

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, 2,228. No official account of the Rebel losses In this engagement is at hand; but the Richmond Ditpatch of May 8th has a bulletin, professedly based on an official dispatch from Gen. Johnston, which, claiming 11 cannon and 623 prisoners captured, admits a Rebel loss of but 220; yet names Gen. Anderson, of North Carolina, Col. Mott, of Mississippi, Col. Ward, 4th Florida, and Col. Winm. H. Palmer, 1st Virginia, as among the killed; and Gen. Early, Gen. Rains, Col. Kemper, 7th Virginia, Col. Corse, 17th Virginia, and Col Garland, of Lynchburg, as wounded; adding: The 1st Virginia was badly cut up. Out of 200 men in the fight, some 80 or 90 are reported killed or wounded. Col. Kemper's regiment suffered terribly, though we have no account of the extent of the casualties. These items indicate a total loss of certainly not less than 1,000. Many of those prisoners, knowing that we had an overwhelming force just at hand, confidently looked for recapture during the night, and werely cha
ried; and by sunrise Sherman had completed his dispositions and given the order to advance. Gen. Corse, with a regiment from Lightburn's brigade, was directed to advance along the ridge; Gen. Morgan L. Smith to move along its cast base, connecting with Corse; Col. Loomis, in like manner, was to advance along its west base, supported by two reserve brigades under Gen. John E. Smith. And thus oherman and up that held by the enemy, to within eighty yards of the Rebel intrenchments, where Gen. Corse found a secondary crest, which he gained and held; calling up his reserves, and preparing to a-to-hand contest was maintained for an hour with varying success and heavy loss on our part; but Corse was unable to carry the enemy's works, as were they to drive him from his sheltering hill. But up to 3 P. M. Meantime, Gen Giles A. Smith had been disabled at 4 P. M. of the day before; and Gen. Corse had been severely wounded at 10 A. M. of this day. Gen. Grant had been awaiting advices of
eff. Davis at Macon Hood flanks Sherman French attacks Allatoona Corse beats him off Hood crosses sand Mountain Thomas intrusted with th Tourtelotte, 4th Minnesota, with three thin regiments. Happily, Gen. Corse, holding Rome, had been ordered hither with his brigade, and had and faintly hear the sound of the guns. He was even able to signal Corse that he was not to be abandoned. Corse had 1,944 men; French manCorse had 1,944 men; French many times that number. The place was completely invested at daylight, and a sharp cannonade of two hours was followed by a summons., which beionveying from peak to peak the messages interchanged by Sherman and Corse. Sherman, on learning that Corse was there, exclaimed, He will holCorse was there, exclaimed, He will hold out! I know the man! And he did hold out; though 707 (more than a third) of his men had fallen, when the enemy desisted. Corse himself hCorse himself had been struck in the face at noon by a bullet, but refused to leave his post; Tourtelotte and Col. R. Rowell, 7th Illinois, were also among
, still with Blair, crossed Nov. 30. the Ogeechee near Barton, advancing to Millen; Dec. 2. Howard, with Wood's and Corse's divisions of the 15th corps, still moving south of the Ogeechee on the old dirt road to Savannah; while Hazen's and Joh Wood threw Dec. 6-7. over the Ogeechee, by a foot-bridge, Williamson's brigade, which moved down the left bank; while Corse crossed his division on pontoons at Jenks's bridge, some distance below; Rice's brigade, in advance, having a smart skirmven: two brigades pushing on to the Savannah and Gulf railroad and breaking it; while J. E. Smith's division closed up on Corse's, and Corse pressed on toward Savannah. He was opposed by 600 infantry and 2 guns; but his advance brigade quickly ran Corse pressed on toward Savannah. He was opposed by 600 infantry and 2 guns; but his advance brigade quickly ran them off, taking a gun and some prisoners. He followed the fugitives across the Little Ogeechee to within 8 miles of the city, where he halted, and resumed breaking up the Gulf railroad; King's bridge having been burned by the enemy. No force rema
s raid through, 716. Alabama, steamer, details of her fight with the Kearsarge, 646 to 648. Albemarle, ram, destruction of the, 535. Alice Dean, steamboat, burned by Morgan, 405. Allatoona Pass, occupied by Sherman, 628; defended by Gen. Corse, 639. Allen, Col. H. W., covers Rebel retreat from Shiloh, 70. Anderson, Brig.-Gen. G. T., wounded at Glendale, 163; present at Malvern Hill, 165; guards the pass at South Mountain, 196; killed at Antietam, 210. Anderson, C., surrenderwithdraws from Presidential canvass, 670. French Emperor proffers his services as mediator between the North and South, 484. French, Gen. (Rebel), commands a division at Antietam, 207; at Fredericksburg, 345; is repelled from Allatoona by Gen. Corse, 639. front Royal, Va., fight at, 133-4. G. Gaines's Mill, Va., battle of, 154 to 158; map of the field, 156; Porter's defeat, 157; losses sustained, 157-8; McClellan's dispatches, 158. Gainesville, battle of, 181; retreat from, 1