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Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 59 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 52 12 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 52 4 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 36 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 30 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 30 4 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 23 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 19 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Mansfield Lovell or search for Mansfield Lovell in all documents.

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nboat, Beauregard, now made at the Queen, which attempted to strike her; but the shock was skillfully evaded by the Beauregard's pilot, who struck the Queen aft so heavily as to disable her. The Union ram Monarch thereupon made at the Beauregard, and struck her heavily on the bow, causing her to fill rapidly and sink, while the Monarch took the Queen in tow and drew her out of peril. Com. Davis's flag-boat, the Benton, threw a 50-pound ball from a rifled Parrott into the Rebel gunboat Gen. Lovell, striking her aft, just above the water-line, and tearing a great hole, into which the water rushed in a torrent. In four minutes, she had sunk in 75 feet of water, carrying down a part of her crew. There remained but four of the Rebel boats; and these, which had been for some time drifting, though firing, now turned their bows toward the Arkansas shore, which the Jeff. Thompson soon reached, when her officers and crew leaped off and ran into the woods, while a shell exploding on her deck
ls, who possess our entire confidence--Gen. Mansfield Lovell and Brig.-Gen. Ruggles. For Commodore health, lie was sent home to die; and Gen. Mansfield Lovell, who had abandoned a lucrative office sor. On assuming command, Oct. 18, 1861. Lovell found the defenses of the great slavemart moressity for leaving that part of the country. Lovell, knowing far better than our commanders the esore 24 and 32-pounders, and a few better guns, Lovell and his naval compatricts, after blocking up m Gen. J. K. Duncan, who had been appointed by Lovell to the command of the coast defenses, and had d Iroquois, had suffered most severely. Gen. Lovell, who had witnessed the combat of our fleet and all her intelligent Rebels knew it. Gen. Lovell, after consultation with the municipal authto comply A messenger was thereupon sent to Gen. Lovell, who informed Capt. Bailey that he had alred children who still crowd the metropolis, General Lovell has evacuated it with his troops, and rest[1 more...]
ree regiments, under Col. Oliver, were thrown out in advance on the Chewalla road, down which the Rebels were advancing. Van Dorn moved at an early hour, and, forming in order of battle at a distance from our outworks, his right, under Gen. Mansfield Lovell, encountered, at 7 1/2 A. M., Oct. 3. our left advance, under Col. Oliver, holding a hill which afforded a strong position, and a broad and extensive view of the country beyond it. He had orders to hold it pretty firmly, so as to compeents of infantry, 16 of cavalry, 13 batteries, and 7 battalions; and that their numbers engaged were nearly double his own, He says, in his official report: We fought the combined Rebel force of Mississippi, commanded by Van Dorn, Price, Lovell, Villipigue, and Rust in person; numbering, according to their own authority, 38,000 men. which he makes less than 20,000 in all. He says, in his testimony before the Committee on the Conduct of the War: Our own force in the fight was a
red enrollment of 70 of the free negroes of that place, to fight in defense of their State; closing with-- Three cheers for the patriotic free negroes of Lynchburg! The next recorded organization of negroes, especially as Rebel soldiers, was at Mobile, toward Autumn ; and, two or three months later, the following telegram was flashed over the length and breadth of the rejoicing Confederacy: New Orleans. Nov. 23, 1861. Over 28,000 troops were reviewed today by Gov. Moore, Maj. Gen. Lovell, and Brig.-Gen. Ruggles. The line was over seven miles long. One regiment comprised 1,400 free colored men. The (Rebel) Legislature of Virginia was engaged, so early as Feb. 4, 1862, on a bill to enroll all the free negroes in the State, for service in the Rebel forces; which was favored by all who discussed it; when it passed to its engrossment, and probably became a law. All these, and many kindred movements in the same direction, preceded Mr. Lincoln's first or premonitory P
carried by Hooker, 439. Loring, Maj.-Gen. W. W., at the Yazoo, 296. Loring, Col., disloyalty of, 19. Louisville Courier, The, citations from, 43. Lovejoy, Hon. Owen, on fugitive slaves, 257. Lovejoy, Ga., Sherman's army at, 634. Lovell, Gen. Mansfield, in command at New Orleans, 85-95. Lynchburg, Va., Hunter miscarries at, 601. Lynde, Maj., 19; treachery of, 20. Lyons, Lord, on Democratic leaders, 484-5-6. Lytle, Col., killed at Perryville, 220. M. Macon, Gars, 556; raises ten regiments and puts down an outbreak, 557; his official report, 558; his estimate of Price's force in Missouri, 562. Ross, Brig.-Gen. L. F., fails to reach the Yazoo, via the Yazoo Pass and Tallahatchie, 297. Rousseau, Gen. Lovell H., at Perryville, 218; at Stone River, 274; in the Atlanta campaign, 631. Rowan, Com., succeeds Goldsborough in command of Burnside's fleet, and destroys Rebel gunboats, 76. Rowan, Capt. (Navy), at Fort Wagner, 480. Royalists of ‘75