hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 356 10 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 317 5 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 305 9 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 224 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 223 3 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 202 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 172 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 155 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 149 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 132 6 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Sterling Price or search for Sterling Price in all documents.

Your search returned 87 results in 13 document sections:

1 2
II. Missouri--Arkansas. Price returns to Missouri guerrilla operations Rains and Stein routed capture of Milford Price retreats to Arkansas Sigel's retreat from Bentonville battle Maysville battle of Prairie Grove. Gen. Sterling Price was a good deal less indignant than any70 wagons laden with clothing and supplies for Price, who lay at Osceola with 8,000 men. Meantime, brother of the late Governor of Kentucky. Price, thus roughly handled before he had been able creek, not far over the State line. Meantime, Price was joined March 3, 1862. and backed by Earhorn Tavern; of the Rebel line confronting it, Price, with his Missourians, formed the right; McInte creek, which is south of Boston Mountain, Gens. Price, McCulloch, Pike, and McIntosh seemed to thto Gens. Ben McCulloch and Mcintosh killed, Gens. Price and Slack were wounded. The victory at Pwestern Arkansas; while considerble numbers of Price's men were clandestinely sent home to enlist r
s and four rams, slowly approached the city. Soon, a Rebel fleet of eight gunboats was seen approaching in order of battle, opening fire when within three-fourths of a mile. The Union ram, Queen of the West, soon struck the Rebel gunboat, Gen. Price, crushing in her wheel-honse, and causing her to leak so badly that she was headed at once for the Arkansas shore. The Rebel gunboat, Beauregard, now made at the Queen, which attempted to strike her; but the shock was skillfully evaded by the Bethe roar and rattle of musketry told them that their brothers were being slaughtered by the fresh legions of the enemy. He had hitherto been buoyed up, or at least had buoyed up the spirits of his soldiers, by expectations and assurances that Gens. Price and Van Dorn, with some 30,000 men from across the Mississippi, were close at hand, and would reach him in time for this day's battle. But they did not come, and Buell did. The hot fire of musketry and artillery poured in upon his entire fron
chusetts, instantly rose and rushed over the Rebel breast-works, chasing out their defenders and following them in their retreat; securing, by their impetuosity, the capture of the larger number, as no time was given for their escape from the Island. Their loss in killed and wounded was but 55; but among the former were Capt. O. J. Wise, son of the General, and other valuable officers; while their loss in prisoners was not far from 2,700, including Cols. Shaw and Jordan, Lt.-Cols. Fowle and Price, Majors Hill, Yates, and Williamson. Our loss in the bombardment and assault was about 50 killed and 250 wounded. All the cannon, small arms, munitions, provisions, etc., on the Island, were among the spoils of victory. Com. Rowan, with 14 gunboats, was dispatched next evening up Albemarle Sound and Pasquotank river in pursuit of the Rebel gunboats. He found them, 7 in number, at Elizabeth City; where, after a smart fight, they were set on fire by their crews and abandoned. One of them
umberland Gap Rosecrans fights Price at Iuka Price retreats to Ripley, Miss. Van Dorn assails Roatisfied Rosecrans that the Rebel army under Gen. Price now occupied luka, he so advised Gen. Grant;iles south of Burnsville, thence advancing on Price from the south. This concentration was duly ethe direction of Iuka; whence he inferred that Price was burning his stores and preparing to retrea. That's Rosecrans's trick, said he; he s got Price where he must suffer. Maybe this is one of tch a shout was never before heard in Corinth. Price's once invincible now invisible legions were back was to have been simultaneous with that of Price. The Generals had arranged to carry Corinth blished, or a terrible failure to be recorded. Price had comparatively plain sailing, and lost no ten. Rosecrans's official report says: When Price's left bore down on our center in gallant styll force of Mississippi, commanded by Van Dorn, Price, Lovell, Villipigue, and Rust in person; numbe[8 more...]
that it is neither its disposition nor its policy to violate law or the rights of individuals in any particular. With great respect, your obedient servant, D. C. Buell, Brig.-Gen. Commanding Department. Hon. J. R. Underwood, Chairman Military Committee, Frankfort, Ky. Gen. Joseph Hooker, commanding on the Upper Potomac, issued March 26, 1862. the following order: To brigade and regimental commanders of this division: Messrs. Nally, Gray, Dunnington, Dent, Adams, Speake, Price, Posey, and Cobey, citizens of Maryland, have negroes supposed to be with some of the regiments of this division: the Brigadier-General commanding directs that they be permitted to visit all the camps of his command, in search of their property; and, if found, that they be allowed to take possession of the same, without any interference whatever. Should any obstacle be thrown in their way by any office or soldier in the division, he will be at once reported by the regimental commander to th
as inadequate to restrain the negro-catching propensitives of some officers in the service, proposed April 3. further action to the same end; and the Senate considered April 14. his resolution of inquiry. Mr. Grimes, of Iowa, in supporting it made a statement as follows: In the month of February last, an officer of the 3d regiment of Iowa infantry, stationed at a small town in Missouri. succeeded in capturing several Rebel bridgeburners, and sone recruiting officers be-longing to Price's army. The information that led to their capture was furnished by two or three remarkably shrewd and intelligent slaves, claimed by a Lt.-Colonel in tie Rebel army. Shortly afterward, the master dispatched an agent, with instructions to seize the slaves, and convey them within the Rebel lines: whereupon, tie Iowa officer seized them, and reported the circumstances to headquarters. The slaves. soon understanding the full import of Gen. Halleck's celebrated Order No. 3, two of them attemp
s for his forces. Fagan, with a part of his men, was promptly on hand; but Sterling Price, owing to heavy rains and consequent high water, was unable to arrive till ary conflict had begun to tell on the resources of the Confederates. Here were Price, and Parsons, and Marmaduke, with what the waste of war had left of their Missot they often failed where endurance was required. In this instance, beside Sterling Price — eminently loved and trusted by the Missourians — the Rebel Governor of Ar or so of the outworks, where they halted till daybreak, and then pushed on. Price, with the brigades of Parsons and McRae, numbering 3,095, was directed to assauen to flee, were obliged to surrender; few of them escaping. Of his 3,095 men, Price reports a total loss this day of 1,111, or more than a third: 105 killed, 504 w were ordered to take, just as they were relieved of a heavy enfilading fire by Price's capture of our works on Graveyard hill. This fort, Fagan now attempted to ca
rude breastworks, and lost very few in their retreat, it is probable that our killed and wounded were the fewer, as these antagonist reports would indicate. Bragg, had won an unmistakable victory; yet all its fruits were reaped on the battle-field. When he advanced in force, Wednesday, Sept. 23. and appeared before Chattanooga, not even the fiercest fire-eater in his camp was anxious to storm those intrenchments, behind which Rosecrans stood ready to repeat the fearful lesson he gave Price and Van Dorn, at Corinth. The victor had the field and the dead (hundreds of whom he inhumanly left to rot unburied) ; but his defeated antagonist had secured the great strategic object of his campaign, Pollard very fairly says: Chickamauga had conferred a brilliant glory upon our arms, but little else. Rosecrans still held the prize of Chattanooga, and with it the possession of East Tennessee. Two-thirds of our niter-beds were in that region, and a large proportion of the coal whic
t Bayou Metea Davidson defeats Marmaduke at Bayou Fourche Price abandons little Rock to Steele Blunt's escort destroyed bymained under the Union flag from and after the expulsion of Price's army by Fremont near the close of 1861. See Vol <*> pptivity by frequent emissaries from compatriots serving with Price, Marmaduke, and other chiefs, who, with their Governor, Claither. Leaving Little Rock about the middle of April, with Price's 1st corps of the trans-Mississippi department, reported (e place being first formally summoned by order of Maj.-Gen. Sterling Price (who was not within 100 miles)--30 minutes being nto our hands; but six steamboats were completely burned by Price, who had Leen in chief command here, with several railroad of Little Rock; but he failed to arrive in season; joining Price's fugitive force somewhere on its retreat to the Washita. Price ultimately fell back to Red river. Gen. Blunt, leaving been on business to Kansas, was returning with a small cavalr
rther, found the enemy in force; while some of Price's men, here taken prisoners, reported a concenartily than Rebels, and standing ready to join Price's army should it appear in the State the ensuiliberty, whereof the Grand Commanders were Sterling Price in the South and C. L. Vallandigham in the North; and that an invasion of Missouri by Price, whom 23,000 members of this order were sworn to s, while his own was but about 200. Still, as Price had not less than 10,000 men against 1,200, anlect a force able to cope in a fair field with Price's veterans and the Sons of Liberty, who were , to the number of perhaps 5,000 more. Unless Price could strike at once some decisive, damaging bcitizens, had been for some days preparing. Price crossed the Moreau after a sharp but brief skio Independence, had opened a door of escape to Price, which lie was too good a general not to profi concentrated his forces and beaten and driven Price before the latter reached Pilot Knob. As t[12 more...]
1 2