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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 236 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 106 0 Browse Search
William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves. 88 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 46 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 38 0 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 30 0 Browse Search
Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 26 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 24 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 24 0 Browse Search
Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.) 24 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Africa or search for Africa in all documents.

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come a rebellious and traitorous enemy, by sparing or protecting the property of those who are waging war against it.< The principal wealth and power of the Rebel States is a peculiar species of property, consisting of the service or labor of African slaves, or the descendants of Africans. This property has been variously estimated at the value of from seven hundred million to one thousand million dollars. Why should this property be exempt from the hazards and consequences of a rebellio rebellion against the United States, and which States may then have voluntarily adopted, or thereafter may voluntarily adopt, immediate or gradual abolishment of Slavery within their respective limits; and that the effort to colonize persons of African descent, with their consent, upon this continent or elsewhere, with the previously obtained consent of the governments existing there, will be continued. That, on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred an
ersons found or being within any place occupied by Rebel forces, and afterward occupied by the forces of the United States--shall be deemed captives of war, and shall be for ever free, and not again held as slaves; that fugitive slaves shall not be surrendered to persons who have given aid and comfort to the Rebellion; that no person engaged in the military or naval service shall surrender fugitive slaves, on pain of being dismissed from the service; that the President may employ persons of African descent for the suppression of the Rebellion, and organize and use them in such manner as he may judge best for the public welfare. This bill passed the House by the decisive majority of 82 Yeas to 42 Nays; also the Senate, by 27 Yeas to 12 Nays; and, being approved by the President, July 17., became the law of the land. President Lincoln having recommended, in his first Annual Message, Dec. 3, 1862. the establishment of Diplomatic intercourse with the republics of Hayti and Li
service of the United States, such number of Volunteers of African descent as you may deem expedient, not exceeding 5,000; anivate and improve the plantations. 5. The population of African descent, that cultivate the land and perform the labor of th Carolina and this point, to organize and discipline our African levies; and that the more promising non-commissioned officamended as to authorize the President to accept persons of African descent, for the purpose of constructing intrenchments, ore it further enacted, That all able-bodied male persons of African descent, between the ages of 20 and 45. whether citizens section of the-Act of 1862, aforesaid, the said persons of African descent were to be paid $10 per month, $3 of it in clothinvice as he may find convenient, and may include persons of African descent, organized into separate corps. Under this order,e years men, with express permission to include persons of African descent, was that issued to Gov. Andrew, Jan. 20th of this