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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 456 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 154 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 72 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 64 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 58 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 54 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 40 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 38 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 36 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Delaware (Delaware, United States) or search for Delaware (Delaware, United States) in all documents.

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New Jersey 2 3 1 4 Pennsylvania 18 7 12 12 Ohio 13 8 5 14 Indiana 7 4 4 7 Illinois 4 5 5 9 Michigan 4 0 5 1 Wisconsin 3 0 3 3 Iowa 2 0 6 0 Minnesota 2 0 2 0   Total, 10 States 78 37 57 67 1860--Lincoln maj.--41. 1862--Opposition maj., 10. note.--A new apportionment under the Census of 1860 changed materially, between 1860 and 1862, the number of Representatives from several of the States. There were some counterbalancing changes in the States of Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri, as also in that of California, where the larger share of the Douglas vote of 1860 was in 1862 cast for the Union tickets; but it was clear, at the close of the State Elections of that year, that the general ill success of the War for the Union, the wide-spread and increasing repugnance to Conscription, Taxation, a depreciated Currency, and high-priced Fabrics, were arraying Public Sentiment against the further prosecution of the contest. Of course, the Op
Garret Davis, of Ky., Carlile, of Va., Saulsbury, of Del., and supported by Messrs. Wilson, of Mass., Howard, 24. it was fiercely assailed by Mr. Saulsbury, of Delaware, and more temperately opposed by Messrs. Willey, oley, of Pa.); Nays--Messrs. Bayard and Saulsbury, of Del., Kennedy, of Md., Carlile, of Va., Powell, of Ky., W. of a joint resolve granting aid to the States of Delaware and Maryland to emancipate their slaves, Mr. Saulsbury, of Del., objected to its consideration ; and it lay over. When called up, Mar. 10. he declared his ireasury for the legal emancipation of the slave of Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Misss with equal zeal and unanimity; even Mr. Fisher, of Del., denouncing it, though he did not vote on the final ssrs. Garret Davis and Powell, of Ky., Saulsbury, of Del., Carlile, of Va., and others of the Opposition; whilof Mass., Diven, of N. Y., Dunn, of Ind., Fisher, of Del., Horton, of Ohio, Wm. Kellogg, of Ill., Killinger, o
s bore but a slim proportion to that of their brethren who seemed just now to have urgent business east of the Susquehanna or west of the Ohio. In other words, the country was profoundly disheartened; while the Army had already absorbed what was bravest and most patriotic of its militia. The number who actually responded to these urgent, repeated, and most reasonable calls from the several States was (liberally estimated) as follows: New York15,000 New Jersey3,000 Pennsylvania25,000 Delaware2,000 Maryland5,000. Gen. Hooker had now begun June 13. to move his army northward-recrossing Howe's division and evacuating the valley of the Rappahannock. Lee had just about a fair week's start of him. Moving rapidly north-westward, with his cavalry thrown well out on his left flank, watching the passes of the Blue Ridge, Hooker's infantry passed through Dumfries, June 14-15. to Centerville, covering Washington, and watching for fresh developments of the enemy's plans. Mean
chusetts--upon a far lighter vote than in 1862--gave a much larger majority. In 1862, Gov. Andrew, 80,835 Devens, 52,587 In 1863, Gov. Andrew, 70,483 Paine, 29,207 And Maryland filled the measure of National triumph by electing Unionists to Congress in four of her five districts, and, for the first time, a distinctively Emancipation Controller and Legislature by some 20,000 majority. New Jersey chose only a Legislature this year, and hence evinced no essential change; while in Delaware, which had to choose specially a Representative in Congress, the Democrats withdrew their candidate on the eve of Election, insisting that the voters were to be overawed, if not worse, by Federal provost marshals and soldiers, under the guise of repressing disloyal utterances and seditious manifestations. The results in Kentucky, Missouri, and other Slave States than Maryland, had very little enduring or general significance; but it was evident, from the verdict of the States nowise expose
surrection, &c., Mr. Grimes, of Iowa, moved July 9. that henceforth there shall be no exemption from Military duty because of color. On the suggestion of Mr. Preston King, of N. Y., this proposition was so amended as to authorize the President to accept persons of African descent, for the purpose of constructing intrenchments, or performing camp service, or any war service for which they may be found competent. This, and the whole project, were vehemently opposed by Messrs. Saulsbury, of Del., G. Davis, of Ky., Carlile, of Va., and others of the Opposition. Mr. G. Davis endeavored to strike out the words last above quoted; but failed: Yeas, 11; Nays, 27. After much debate, the Senate decided, by close votes, to free, as a reward for services in the Union armies, the slaves of Rebels only, and not to free the wives and children even of these. In this shape, the bill passed July 15. the Senate: Yeas 28 (including Mr. Rice, of Minn.); Nays 9 (all the Opposition present and voti
in the recent elections held in Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, and Delaware, was a shameful violation of the Constitution ; and the repetitionipated. Gen. McClellan secured the Electoral votes of New Jersey, Delaware, and Kentucky--21 in all: the residue--212 Nevada chose three eear approach to equality were New York, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Delaware, and perhaps New Hampshire, New Jersey, and Oregon. No election68,726361,986 New Jersey60,72368,014 Pennsylvania296,389276,308 Delaware8,1158,767 Maryland40,15332,739 Kentucky27,78664,301 Ohio265,154ep.-Union.Dem.Rep.-Union.Dem. California3--3-- Connecticut314-- Delaware1----1 Illinois59113 Indiana4783 Iowa6--6-- Kansas1--1-- Kentu California--Conness.--Total, 38. Nays--[All Democrats.] Delaware--Riddle, Saulsbury. Kentucky--Davis, Powell. Indiana--HendriMyers, C. O'Neill, Schofield, Stevens, Thayer, Tracy, Williams. Delaware--Smithers. Maryland--Cresswell, Henry Winter Davis, F. Thomas,