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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 346 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 72 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 60 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 56 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 46 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 46 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 28 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 26 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Oregon (Oregon, United States) or search for Oregon (Oregon, United States) in all documents.

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Mr. Henderson, of Mo., supported it, and thenceforward acted as an emancipationist. Messrs. Sherman, of Ohio, Doolittle, of Wise., Browning, of Ill., and Morrill, of Maine, also advocated the measure; and it passed Apr. 2.--Yeas 32 (including Davis, of Ky., Henderson, of Mo., Thomson [Dem.], of N. J., and Willey, of Pa.); Nays--Messrs. Bayard and Saulsbury, of Del., Kennedy, of Md., Carlile, of Va., Powell, of Ky., Wilson, of Mo., Wright, of N. J., Latham, of Cal., Nesmith and Stark, of Oregon. It is noteworthy that a majority of these Nays were the votes of Senator from Border States, to which it proffered compensation for their slaves, all whom have since been freed without compensation. The President of course approved Apr. 10. the measure; bur no single Slave State ever claimed its benefits; and its only use inhered in its demonstration of the willingness of the Unionists to increase their already heavy burdens to pay for the saves of the Border States--a willingness whic
National effort under its present aspects as a war not for the Union, but for the Negro, were aroused by it to a more determined and active opposition. The bill passed the House by Yeas 115, Nays 49--the division being, so nearly as might be, a party one--while in the Senate, a motion by Mr. Bayard that it be indefinitely postponed was supported by 11 Yeas (all Democrats) to 35 Nays: consisting of every Republican lican present, with Messrs. McDougall, of California, Harding and Nesmith, of Oregon. The bill then passed without a call of the Yeas and Nays. The President proceeding to constitute an enrolling board for each Congress district in the loyal States, and the Board to enroll those who were held to military service under its provisions, the repugnance to being drafted into the service began to threaten organized and formidable resistance. That the enrolling act was unconstitutional and void, was very generally held and proclaimed by the Opposition, and was in due time form
y were New York, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Delaware, and perhaps New Hampshire, New Jersey, and Oregon. No election was held in the ten States which were or had been most completely under the sway267,370 Iowa87,33149,260 Wisconsin79,56463,875 Minnesota25,06017,375 California62,13443,841 Oregon9,8888,457 Kansas14,2283,871 West Virginia23,22310,457 Nevada9,8266,594   Total2,213,6651,80Minnesota2--2-- Missouri5481 New Hampshire213-- New Jersey1423 New York17142011 Ohio514172 Oregon1--1-- Pennsylvania1212159 Rhode Island2--2-- Vermont3--3-- West Virginia3--3-- Wisconsin335 Wisconsin--Doolittle, Howe. Minnesota--Ramsey, Wilkinson. Kansas--J. H. Lane, Pomeroy. Oregon--Harding, Nesmith. California--Conness.--Total, 38. Nays--[All Democrats.] Delaware--R Wisconsin--Cobb, McIndoe, Sloan, Wheeler. Minnesota--Donnelly, Windom. Kansas--Wilder. Oregon--McBride. Nevada--Worthington. California--Cole, Higby, Shannon.--Total, 119. Nays--[A
oicings and congratulations; and the President, after attending a meeting of his Cabinet to receive a personal report from Gen. Grant, just arrived from Appomattox, listening to the story of Lee's surrender from his son, Capt. Robert Lincoln, who, being on Grant's staff, had been an eye-witness of the scene, and giving audience to several public men — among them John P. Hale, just appointed Minister to Madrid, and Speaker Colfax, who was taking leave for an overland journey to California and Oregon--concluded to seek relaxation from his many and weighty cares by spending the evening at Ford's Theater, where Gen. Grant and he had been publicly announced as probable visitors that night, while the former had been compelled by inexorable duties to disappoint the expectation thus excited. At 8 P. M., the President and his wife, with two others, rode to the theater, and were ushered into the private box previously secured by him; where, at 10 1/2 P. M., while all were intent on the play, an