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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 226 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 49 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 28, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 15, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Francis Thomas or search for Francis Thomas in all documents.

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rigade of Ewell's division held the road, and was so desperately charged in front and on its right flank, that it held its ground only by the opportune arrival of Thomas's brigade of Hill's division; while the left of Jackson's division, under Taliaferro, was so assailed in flank and rear that one brigade was routed and the whole y engaged the enemy; but so severe was the fire in front and flank of Branch's brigade as to produce in it some disorder and falling back. The brigades of Gregg, Thomas, and Pender were then thrown into the fight. Soon, a portion of Ewell's division became engaged. The conflict now raged with great fury; the enemy obstinately and desperately contesting the ground until their Gens. Kearny and Stevens fell in front of Thomas's brigade; after which, they retired from the field. By the following morning, the Federal army had entirely disappeared from our view; and it soon appeared, by a report from Gen. Stuart, that it had passed Fairfax Court House and ha
Messrs. J. B. Blair and Wm. G. Brown, of Va., James S. Rollins, of Mo., and Francis Thomas, of Md., voted Nay with the Democrats and Kentuckians.] The bill, thus pass others not strictly partisans) to 31 Nays (including Crisfield, Leary, and Francis Thomas, of Md., with Crittenden, Dunlap, Harding, Wadsworth, and Wickliffe, of Ky.into power --a usurpation --destructive of the good of the country, &c., &c. Judge Thomas, of Mass., held that Congress could not warrantably pass this act without prthe Previous Question: Yeas,85 (all Republicans but Sheffield, of R. I., and Judge Thomas, of Mass.--to meet whose objections the original bill had been modified): Nader-State Unionists who voted, including Messrs. Calvert, Crisfield, Leary, Francis Thomas, and Webster, of Md., J. B. Blair, Wm. G. Brown, and Segar, of Va., Casey, ich would overthrow the one, and blot out the stars from the other. Said Judge Thomas (Conservative), of Massachusetts: That the bills before the House are in
ctively; the Center, under Maj.-Gen. Geo. II. Thomas, with its subordinate divisions led by Maj.-Ge The lesson did not require repetition. Gen. Thomas having thrown forward on our left a brigadeer McCook, numbered 15,933 ; the Center, under Thomas, 13,39; the Left, under Crittenden, 13,288; beng upon our center, where Negley's division of Thomas's corps was desperately engaged, with its ammuRebel attack had by this time fallen wholly on Thomas, commanding our center; Sheridan, entirely outey's and Rousseau's divisions. This compelled Thomas to withdraw them from the cedar woods to more lliam S. Rosecrans. Thousands had done nobly — Thomas, Sheridan, Wood, Rousseau, Palmer, Van Cleve, lowing days and nights of the fight. Under Gen. Thomas's direction. I had it intrenched by rifle-ch even Murfreesboroa could be shelled; and Gens. Thomas and Rousseau, who had for days been annoyed cavalry ordered to reconnoiter. He adds that Thomas, on Monday morning, drove the Rebel rear-guard[2 more...]
crans had his headquarters in Manchester, with Thomas's corps around him; Sheridan, with the right ds at Stevenson, our army moved on: Aug. 16. Thomas's corps following the general direction of theoe's crossing, considerably to our left; while Thomas's corp and part of McCook's prepared to pass ttail these isolated commands, and to fall upon Thomas, who had got the enemy's center into McLamore's are so frequently defeated. Had he permitted Thomas to force his way through Dug gap, with barely was a lull of an hour, or from 4 to 5 P. M. Thomas well understood that the fight was not over, ans — Reynolds being first struck on his right (Thomas having been looking for an attack on his left)isiting our left, and was now directed to send Thomas his reserve brigade only; holding his place in relieved and enabled to proceed to strengthen Thomas, where he was sorely needed. Both armies stfayette road, where Capt. Gaw had ere this, by Thomas's order, massed all the artillery he could fin[36 more...]
strength for some years. Connecticut had, by common consent, been chosen as the arena of a determined trial of strength, at her State Election this Spring, April 6. between the supporters and opponents respectively of the War for the Union. The nomination for Governor by the Republicans of William A. Buckingham, the incumbent, who had, both officially and personally, been a strenuous and prominent champion of coercion, was fairly countered by the presentation, as his competitor, of Col. Thomas II. Seymour, an ex-Governor of decided personal popularity, but an early, consistent, out-spoken contemner of the War — or rather, of the National side of it. His nomination was made by a very large Convention, and with a degree of unanimity and genuine enthusiasm rarely manifested; while the canvass that ensued thereon was one of the most animated and energetic ever witnessed even in that closely balanced State: its result being the triumph of the Republicans by a much reduced but still
thereon Jeff. Davis on Butler and Phelps together Congress orders a general enrollment, regardless of color Democratic denunciation thereof Gov. Andrew, of Mass., raises two Black regiments New York, by her loyal League, follows the example Rebel employment of negroes in War Beauregard and Jeff. Davis on Federal arming of Blacks the Confederate Congress punishes it with death President Lincoln threatens retaliation Garrett Davis, S. S. Cox & co. Denounce the arming of Blacks Adjt.-Gen. Thomas engages in the work his speech at Lake Providence Gen. Banks's order negro recruiting goes ahead efficiency of Black soldiers. the first fatal collision March 5, 1770. between British soldiers and American patriots was popularly distinguished as the Boston Massacre; and Crispus Attucks, a mulatto fugitive from Massachusetts Slavery, was a leader of the patriot mob, and one of the four killed outright by the British fire. At the fight of Bunker Hill, June 17, 1775. Peter S
gain overtake them till he reached Fayetteville, Ark., where Col. Larue Harrison, 1st Arkansas cavalry, had been invested Oct. 28. by Col. Brooks, with some 2,000 Rebels; who was held at bay until Fagan's division of Price's army appeared Nov. 14. and united in the siege; but Curtis came up next day, and drove off the crowd, with heavy loss to them and none at all to our side. So ended the last Rebel invasion of Missouri. Gen. Smith's command had, ere this, taken boats to report to Gen. Thomas at Nashville. Rosecrans says Price's force in this campaign was variously estimated at 15,000 to 25,000 men — that he obtained 6,000 recruits in Missouri--that lie lost 10 guns (nearly all he had) and 1,958 prisoners, with most of his wagons, and large numbers of horses, small arms, &c. It is not probable that the force he took out of Missouri, with its armament, was half so effective as that he brought into it. Gen. Grant, in his all-embracing report, says: The impunity with wh
to ours, was maintained till 3 P. M. And now a shout from the far right, shut out from view by woods and hills, announced that the turning movement was effected — that our cavalry under Torbert, and Crook with his 8th corps (the Army of West Virginia that was), have struck the enemy's left in flank, and are charging it under a terrible fire. Instantly, a redoubled fire breaks out along our central front, in spite of the general scarcity of cartridges; and, these being soon exhausted, Col. Thomas, 8th Vermont, ordered his men to charge at double quick with the bayonet. In vain general officers shouted Halt Lie down! Wait for supports! &c.; for, while some were still confused and vacillating, a staff officer from the right galloped in front, and pointed with his saber to the woods which sheltered the enemy. At once, all dissent was silenced, all hesitation at an end; the whole center, as one man, swept forward, cheering, and plunged into the woods, meeting there Crook's corps
, moving on the east, should aim to come in on Thomas's left. Johnston promptly divined this moveme led by Hood, with intent to interpose between Thomas's right and Schofield's left, near what was kno points, south of Kenesaw, and in front of Gens. Thomas and McPherson respectively; but the enemy'sral points — all skirmishing heavily; when, as Thomas was moving two of Howard's divisions to the lehen to the West Point railroad above Fairburn; Thomas coming into position just above him near Red Other of Hood's irruptions, to Rough-and-Ready; Thomas to a point designated as Couch's; while Howardwhile ours was hardly 500. Sherman was with Thomas at Conch's, intent on road-breaking, when the d below Jonesborough. Davis's corps, being on Thomas's right, soon closed on to Howard, relieving B was reserved for operations in Georgia. To Thomas was confided the defense of Tennessee, with unhis back again on Tennessee until assured that Thomas was strong enough to hold it. And now, learnin[16 more...]
Vermont--Baxter, Morrill, Woodbridge. New York — A. W. Clark, Freeman Clark, Davis, Frank, Ganson, Griswold, Herrick, Hotchkiss, Hulburd, Kellogg, Little-john, Marvin, Miller, Morris, Nelson, Odell, Pomeroy, Radford, Steele, Van Valkenburg. New Jersey--Starr. Pennsylvania--Baily, Broomall, Coffroth, Hale, Kelley, McAllister, Moorhead, A. Myers, L. Myers, C. O'Neill, Schofield, Stevens, Thayer, Tracy, Williams. Delaware--Smithers. Maryland--Cresswell, Henry Winter Davis, F. Thomas, Webster. West Virginia--Blair, Brown, Whaley. Kentucky--Anderson, Randall, Smith, Yeaman. Ohio — Ashley, Eckley, Garfield, Hutchins, Schenck, Spaulding. Indiana--Colfax, Dumont, Julian, Orth. Illinois--Arnold, Farnsworth, Ingersoll, Norton, E. B. Washburne. Missouri--Blow, Boyd, King, Knox, Loan, McClurg, J. S. Rollins. Michigan--A. C. Baldwin, Beaman, Driggs, F. W. Kellogg, Longyear, Upson. Iowa — Allison, Grinnell, A. W. Hubbard, Kasson, Price, Wilson. Wiscons<
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