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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 72 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz). You can also browse the collection for Pa Meade or search for Pa Meade in all documents.

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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 3 (search)
t bloody failures of the War, and who is utterly incompetent to the post. Why is he pushed? Because he professes to be an ultra-Republican, ah, voila! . . . Pa Meade is at Washington but I hope to have him back to-morrow. Behold my prophecy in regard to Kill-cavalry's raid fulfilled. I have heard many persons very indignant Florida reverse. Things have narrowed down now to two or three great centres, and upon large operations there depends the result. It is a favorite remark of General Meade, that there is but one way to put down this rebellion, namely, to destroy the military power of the Rebels. Their great armies must be overwhelmed, and there , per contra, without affectation of homeliness; he sits firmly in the saddle and looks straight ahead, as if only intent on getting to some particular point. General Meade says he is a very amiable man, though his eye is stern and almost fierce-looking. Well, we encountered him, as aforesaid, followed by three or four aides; o
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 4 (search)
rest. Grant seemed of the same mind and asked Meade: Who is this General Gregg? You ought to arresnd of which ends on the Germanna plank. General Meade was in favor of swinging back both wings setreating south. The day before, Grant told Meade that Joe Johnston would have retreated after t slow to hunt out), and then we waited for General Meade, who had waited behind to speak with Hancoear. S. replied that he never got the order. Meade then apologized, but Sheridan was plainly full his dislike of Warren and ill-feeling against Meade.--Lyman's Journal. . . . I think there was morht flank and rear. Betimes in the morning General Meade, with three aides, rode back to General Ha he lay on the stretcher, he called out to General Meade: Don't you give up this fight! I am williounded by blue blouses. I was now sent by General Meade to see how far General Wright's column of I dismounted and wrote a short despatch to General Meade, midst a heavy rain that now began to come[16 more...]
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
447.] Headquarters Army of Potomac Sunday evening, May 22, 1864 Gen. Meade said to me at breakfast: I am afraid the rebellion cannot be crusing, and it was long before she fully appreciated the fact that General Meade, would not order her to instant death. To-night she has two se on the purloined black pony, ambled along at a great pace, but General Meade, who got his pride up at Grant's rapidity, set off at a rate th they had laid across some boards and made a table, round which sat Meade, Grant, General Williams, etc., writing on little slips of paper. only the people had unaccountably put on very dusty uniforms. General Meade is of a perverse nature; when he gets in a disagreeable place, yesterday, when we had our bloody attack along the whole line, General Meade had ordered his whole Staff ready at four in the morning. Now, patches are commonly (not always) frank and not exaggerated. General Meade got awfully mad, while waiting at the church. There came a cip