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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 355 3 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 147 23 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 137 13 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 135 7 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 129 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 125 13 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 108 38 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 85 7 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 84 12 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 70 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War. You can also browse the collection for Banks or search for Banks in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 6 document sections:

General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 2 (search)
stead of being brought to Washington, is conclusive on that point. I have never doubted the correctness of my course on that occasion. Had I done so, the results of the invasions made subsequently by disciplined and much more numerous armies, properly equipped and provided, and commanded by the best soldiers who appeared in that war, would have reassured me. The first of these expeditions was after General Lee's victory over Pope, and those of Majors-General Jackson and Ewell over Fremont, Banks, and Shields, in 1862; the second, when the way was supposed to have been opened by the effect of General Lee's victory at Chancellorsville, in 1863. The armies defeated on those occasions were four times as numerous as that repulsed on the 21st of July, 1861, and their losses much greater in proportion to numbers; yet the spirit of the Northern people was so roused by these invasions of their country, that their armies, previously defeated on our soil, met ours on their own at Sharpsbur
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 4 (search)
in his office, with his cabinet. After it had become evident that the Valley was to be invaded by an army too strong to be encountered by Jackson's division, that officer was instructed to endeavor to employ the invaders in the Valley, but without exposing himself to the danger of defeat, by keeping so near the enemy as to prevent him from making any considerable detachment to reenforce McClellan, but not so near that he might be compelled to fight. Under these instructions, when General Banks, approaching with a Federal force greatly superior to his own, was within four miles of Winchester, General Jackson March 12th. fell back slowly before him to Strasburg — marching that distance, of eighteen miles, in two days. After remaining there undisturbed until the 16th, finding that the Federal army was again advancing, he fell back to Mount Jackson, twenty-four miles, his adversary halting at Strasburg. General Jackson's report, showing these relative positions, made with hi
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 5 (search)
the decks of vessels in the river below. On the l7th, the army encamped about three miles from Richmond, in front of the line of redoubts constructed in 1861. Hill's division in the centre, formed across the Williamsburg road; Longstreet's on the right, covering the river road; Magruder's on the left, crossing the Nine-miles road; and Smith's in reserve, behind Hill's left and Magruder's right. Generals Jackson and Ewell, the former commanding as senior officer, were then opposing General Banks, in the Valley of the Shenandoah, still under my direction. The President had placed Brigadier-General J. R. Anderson, with nine thousand men, in observation of General McDowell, who was at Fredericksburg with forty-two thousand men; Brigadier-General Branch, with four or five thousand, at Gordonsville; and had halted Huger's division at Petersburg, when on its way to Richmond, under my orders. That division, estimated by the Secretary of War and General Lee at eighteen thousand a mont
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
ans of relieving the place; that General Taylor, on the opposite side of the Mississippi, would give him all the assistance in his power, and that it was of the greatest importance that Port Hudson should hold out as long as possible, to keep General Banks's army employed in the South. This was repeated on the 20th. In the mean time, my telegraphic correspondence with the President and Secretary of War had kept them informed of the condition of military affairs in Mississippi, especially o daring, than, through prudence even, to be inactive. I look to attack in the last resort, but rely on your resources of generalship to suggest less desperate modes of relief. I can scarce dare to suggest, but might it not be possible to strike Banks first, and unite the garrison of Port Hudson with you, or to secure sufficient cooperation from General Smith, or to practically besiege Grant by operations with artillery, from the swamps, now dry, on the north side of the Yazoo, below Haynes's
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Letters. (search)
Mississippi River, an active army of about forty thousand men, to oppose the troops of Grant and Banks, and for garrisons at Vicksburg and Port Hudson, capable of holding those places against combinemy is estimated at thirty-eight thousand; that which attacked Vicksburg at thirty thousand; and Banks is supposed to be assembling twenty-five thousand at Baton Rouge. Should a large portion of thelled Grant to fall back, but we must expect him to advance again as soon as practicable. Should Banks and Sherman move at the same time, we could not oppose such a combination with our present forceal E. Kirby Smith, Commanding Trans-Mississippi Department: Port Hudson is invested by Major-General Banks, Vicksburg by Major-General Grant. I am preparing to aid Vicksburg, but cannot march to desperate modes of relief. I can scarce dare to suggest, but might it not be possible to strike Banks first, and unite the garrison of Port Hudson with you, or to secure sufficient cooperation from
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Telegrams. (search)
Telegrams. Richmond, July 9, 1863. General J. E. Johnston: If it be true that General Taylor has joined General Gardner and routed Banks, you will endeavor to draw heavy reinforcements from that army, and delay a general engagement until your junction is effected. Thus, it is hoped, the enemy may yet be crushed, and the late disaster be repaired. Send by telegraph a list of the general and staff officers who have come out on parole from Vicksburg, so that they may be exchanged immediately. As soon as practicable, let the lists of regiments and other organizations be forwarded for same purpose. General Rains should now apply his invention. Jefferson Davis. Jackson, July 9, 1863. To his Excellency the President: The enemy is advancing in two columns on Jackson, now about four miles distant. I shall endeavor to hold the place, as the possession of Mississippi depends on it. His force is about double ours. J. E. Johnston. Jackson, July 10, 1863. To his Excell