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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 166 56 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 114 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 98 10 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 91 9 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 78 2 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 77 7 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 58 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 58 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 45 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 40 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War. You can also browse the collection for Hardee or search for Hardee in all documents.

Your search returned 111 results in 10 document sections:

General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 6 (search)
Polk's corps, forming the centre, by the little river, the course of which there crossed General Bragg's line obliquely. Hardee's corps — constituted the left wing. Both armies were drawn up in two lines. The Federal, much the more numerous, had as left leading, to drive the Confederate army to the west of the Murfreesboroa road, with a similar object. Lieutenant-General Hardee's corps was in motion at dawn, and his attack made at sunrise by McCown's division, his first line; his second,on its right and engaging the enemy soon after. The Federal troops, surprised and assailed with the skill and vigor that Hardee never failed to exhibit in battle, were driven back, although formed in two lines, while the assailants were in but one.put in motion about mid. night, and marched quietly across Duck River, Polk's corps halting opposite to Shelbyville, and Hardee's at Tullahoma. General Bragg estimates his force at thirty thousand infantry and artillery, and five thousand cavalr
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
having negro laborers collected and sent to Mobile, to work on the fortifications. Lieutenant-General Hardee, transferred from the Army of Tennessee to that of Mississippi, had arrived at Morton.i, to join the garrison if necessary, amounted to but eleven thousand. On the 29th Lieutenant-General Hardee was assigned by the Administration to the service of reorganizing the prisoners parolehurried to Atlanta, to save that depot and give him time to defeat the enemy's plans. Lieutenant-General Hardee was immediately requested to send Gregg's and McNair's brigades from Meridian and Ente troops at Demopolis, and on the 20th those at Enterprise. While there he transferred Lieutenant-General Hardee back to the Army of Tennessee, and assigned Lieutenant-General Polk to the position he had occupied in the Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana. With Lieutenant-General Hardee he transferred Pettus's and Moore's brigades, then at Demopolis, to General Bragg's command. All le
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 9 (search)
. mine in reply. condition of the army. General Hardee ordered to Mississippi to repel General Shin our front. dispositions to meet them. General Hardee and his troops return to Dalton. correspo of the army now under the charge of Lieutenant-General Hardee. You were also informed that you wofor either march. General Bragg and Lieutenant-General Hardee, in suggesting the offensive, proposs formed two corps: one commanded by Lieutenant-General Hardee, composed of Cheatham's, Breckenridgrected me, by telegraph, to dispatch Lieutenant-General Hardee to Mississippi with Cheatham's, Cleb marching back toward Vicksburg; and Lieutenant-General Hardee's corps, of which only the leading tigade, the foremost of the returning troops of Hardee's corps, had just arrived at the railroad-statrg began on the 21st. In consequence of this, Hardee's troops ( the reinforcements referred to abovd have been intended to cause the recalling of Hardee's troops, for they had been on their way back [1 more...]
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 10 (search)
ddon, I had no authority to do so. It is hoped but little time will be required to prepare the force now under your command, as the season is at hand, and the time seems propitious. Such additional forces will be ordered to you as the exigencies of the service elsewhere will permit, and it is hoped your own efforts will secure many absentees and extra-duty men to the ranks. The deficiency you report in artillery-horses seems very large, and so different from the account given by General Hardee on turning over the command, that hopes are entertained that there must be some error on your part. Prompt measures should be taken by you, however, to supply the want, whatever it may be. The part of your letter relative to this and field transportation will be referred to the Quartermaster-General. Colonel Alexander, applied for by you, as chief of artillery, is deemed necessary by General Lee, in his present position. Brigadier-General W. N. Pendleton, an experienced officer
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 11 (search)
ood's corps, and the second line of Polk's and Hardee's, might constitute a force strong enough to d three brigades ordered to him from Polk's and Hardee's corps. Major-General Stevenson had, earlcient for Hood's and Polk's corps, and half of Hardee's, formed as usual in two lines, and in that otroops, and produce that inability. Lieutenant-General Hardee, who arrived after this decision, reIn consequence of this intelligence, Lieutenant-General Hardee was ordered to march that afternoon,left and the Powder Spring road was guarded by Hardee's corps. There was little activity apparent ifrom that vicinity toward Atlanta: the left of Hardee's corps at Gilgal Church, Bate's division occu 16th a new disposition was made on the left. Hardee's corps changed front to the rear on its rightthe interval between his right and the left of Hardee's corps. To direct his line toward it, a partservice of his own corps in this campaign, General Hardee wrote: But the heaviest losses of the enem[42 more...]
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 12 (search)
The troops of the department, under Lieutenant-General Hardee's command, were moving from Charlestlotte, General Beauregard instructed Lieutenant-General Hardee to direct his march toward Greensboron Fayetteville, orders were sent to Lieutenant-General Hardee to turn directly to that place; but s, and at seven o'clock next morning Lieutenant-General Hardee was attacked by those corps in a posthe 17th, that the troops with which Lieutenant-General Hardee was engaged the day before were not ederal forces was gathered during the day. General Hardee remained at Elevation to give his men the evation, which it reduced almost as much. General Hardee found it too great for a day's march. om that ground, nearer, by several miles, than Hardee's bivouac, and therefore we could not hope forurgently for strong reenforcements. Lieutenant-General Hardee, the head of whose column was then nerate forces were ordered to march to Raleigh: Hardee's corps, with Butler's division as rearguard, [17 more...]
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 14 (search)
he subject — the return sent to the Confederate War-Office, prepared by Major Kinloch Falconer of the Adjutant-General's Department, from the reports of Lieutenant-Generals Hardee and Hood, and Major. General Wheeler. General Sherman states in his report that he commenced the campaign with above ninety-eight thousand men. But, asounting of heavy rifle-cannon, just brought from Mobile, on the front toward the enemy. As to the almost impregnable character of the available positions; General Hardee wrote in his letter of April 10, 1868, already quoted: The country between Dalton and Atlanta is, for the most part, open, intersected by numerous practicable the manner in which the progress of the enemy was resisted, the dispirited condition of the army, and its want of confidence in me, the reader is referred to General Hardee's testimony in the letter on pages 365, 366, and General Stewart's in that on pages 367-369. Mr. Davis's official course toward me, from the commencement
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Letters. (search)
. President: Your telegram ordering me to General Bragg's headquarters was received in Mobile, when I was on my way to them. Your letter of January 22d reached me here on the 30th. I have spoken to General Bragg, Lieutenant-Generals Polk and Hardee, and Governor Harris, on the subject of your letter . . . I respectfully suggest that, should it then appear to you necessary to remove General Bragg, no one in this army, or engaged in this investigation, ought to be his successor. Most respnicative. I am told, however, that he is confident that the canal cannot be made. It seems to me to depend upon the condition of the river, whether or not it is too high for work with spades. I have been told by Lieutenant-Generals Polk and Hardee that they have advised you to remove General Bragg and place me in command of this army. I am sure that you will agree with me that the part that I have borne in this investigation would render it inconsistent with my personal honor to occupy th
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Memorandum for Colonel Browne, Aide-de-camp. (search)
ed by General Hood. On the 18th of July the command was turned over to General Hood. The first return thereafter was that of August 1st, after the engagements of Peach-tree Creek, on the 21st, and around Atlanta, on the 22d and 28th July. 7. The foregoing figures are taken from the official records kept by me as Assistant Adjutant-General of the Army. (Signed) Kinloch Falconer, Assistant Adjutant-General. In the return of the Army of Tennessee, printed July 10, 1864, opposite to Hardee's corps, in the column of remarks, is written: One hundred and seven officers and two thousand and fifty-two men, prisoners of war, are reported among the absent without leave. And, opposite to Hood's corps, two hundred and thirty-eight officers and four thousand five hundred and ninety-seven men, prisoners of war, are reported among the absent without leave. Below is written this explanation, in Major Falconer's handwriting: The officers and soldiers reported absent without leave, and
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Consolidated Summaries in the armies of Tennessee and Mississippi during the campaign commencing May 7, 1864, at Dalton, Georgia, and ending after the engagement with the enemy at Jonesboroa and the evacuation at Atlanta, furnished for the information of General Joseph E. Johnston (search)
River, for the Period commencing May 7, and ending May 20, 1864: Corps.Killed.Wounded.Total Hardee's119859978 Hood's2831,5641,847 Polks army, Mississippi42405447 4442,8283,272 Consolidatees of Engagements around New Hope Church, near Marietta, Georgia: Corps.Killed.Wounded.Total Hardee's1731,0481,221 Hood's103679732 Polk's army, Mississippi33194227 3091,9212,230 Consolidatngagements around Marietta, Georgia, from June 4 to July 4, 1864: Corps.Killed.Wounded.Total Hardee's2001,4331,633 Hood's1401,1211,261 Polk's army, Mississippi1289261,054 4683,4803,948 Connd Atlanta, Georgia, commencing July 4, and ending July 31, 1864: Corps.Killed.Wounded.Total Hardee's5232,7743,297 Lee's3512,4082,759 Stewart's4362,1412,577 Wheeler's cavalry29156185 Engineer'around Atlanta and Jonesboroa from August 1 to September 1, 1864: Corps.Killed.Wounded.Total Hardee's1411,0181,159 Lee's2481,6311,879 Stewart's93574667 4823,2233,705 Consolidation of which