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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 45 45 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 28 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 13 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 11 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 10 10 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 6 6 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War. You can also browse the collection for Rome, Ga. (Georgia, United States) or search for Rome, Ga. (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Report of Hon. L. T. Wigfall in the Senate of the Confederate States, march 18, 1865. (search)
he 6th of that month. The official records show, then, that General Hood over-estimated General Johnston's forces at and near Dalton by twenty-five thousand and eighty-seven men. If General Hood, by the term at and near Dalton, refers to the forces after this date received by General Johnston from General Polk, he is again in error as to numbers. It was not till the 4th of May that General Polk was ordered to move with Loring's division and other available force at your command, to Rome, Georgia, and thence unite with General Johnston. On the 6th, the day on which General Hood says this army lay at and near Dalton, waiting the advance of the enemy, General Polk telegraphs to General Cooper from Demopolis: My troops are concentrating and moving as directed. On the 10th, at Rome, he telegraphs the President: The first of Loring's brigade arrived and sent forward to Resaca; the second just in; the third will arrive to-morrow morning. . . . French's brigade was to leave Blue Mount