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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 308 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 70 0 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 44 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 32 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 26 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 23 13 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 14 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War. You can also browse the collection for Chattahoochee River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) or search for Chattahoochee River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 11 (search)
he main body of our army to that place, the necessity of abandoning it involved the taking a new line. The three corps were accordingly brought to the intrenched position just prepared by General Shoupe, which covered both routes to Atlanta, in the morning of the 5th-Major-General Wheeler covering the withdrawal of the right and centre, and General Jackson that of the left. After the infantry and artillery were disposed in the new position, the cavalry was sent to the south bank of the Chattahoochee; Wheeler's to observe the river above, and Jackson's below. The Federal army approached as cautiously as usual, covering itself by intrenchments as soon as its scouts discovered our line of skirmishers. As soon as these works were strong enough to protect thoroughly the troops occupying them, the passage of the river was commenced by General Sherman above, where fords are numerous and broad. On the 8th. two of his corps crossed and intrenched. In consequence of this, the Confeder
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 12 (search)
ral commanding United States Forces in N. C. General Sherman assured me that he would remove from the department all the troops he had brought into it as soon as practicable, after returning to his headquarters, leaving only those of General Schofield's command, who were thought necessary for the maintenance of law and order. Accordingly, on the 27th (the day after), his order No. 66 of that year was published, announcing a final agreement between us, terminating the war east of the Chattahoochee River; sending his own army to Washington; Major-General Wilson's cavalry back to the Tennessee River, near Decatur; and directing Major-General Stoneman's division to return to East Tennessee. General Sherman was accompanied on this occasion by several among the most distinguished officers of the United States Army. The impression was made distinctly on my mind that they, and the army generally, desired peace on the conditions of the convention of the 18th, and regretted the rejectio
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Memoranda of the operations of my corps, while under the command of General J. E. Johnston, in the Dalton and Atlanta, and North Carolina campaigns. (search)
xtreme left of the army. However, nothing of importance occurred on my line while in this position, save that, on the 22d of June, the divisions of Stevenson and Hindman attacked the enemy, driving him from two lines of works, and capturing some prisoners belonging to Schofield and Hooker. From here the army changed position to the vicinity of Nickagack Creek, my corps on the left. We subsequently withdrew from this position, and took up a line on the immediate north bank of the Chattahoochee River. After remaining here for several days, the enemy crossed the river and went into bivouac. For further particulars, I refer you to reports of generals of divisions. I inclose Major-General Cleburne's report, and will forward others as soon as received. Respectfully, J. B. Hood, Lieutenant-General. General J. E. Johnston, Macon, Georgia. Richmond, February 22, 1865. General J. E. Johnston: The Secretary of War directs that you report by telegram to General R. E. Lee, Petersb