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ing the bridges and covering the roads to Alexandria, Fairfax, and Falls Church. The division in military occupation of Maryland under Gen. Banks, most of which is concentrated in and around Baltimore, consists of 7,400 men, with some field-guns. The corps at Fortress Monroe and Hampton, under Gen. Butler, is 11,000 strong, with two field batteries, some guns of position, and the fortress itself in hand. Gen. Lyon, who is operating in Missouri with marked success, has about 6,500 men. Gen. Prentiss at Cairo commands a division of 6,000 men and two field-batteries. There are beside these forces many regiments organized and actually in the field. The army under the command of Gen. Beauregard at Manassas Junction is estimated at 60,000, but that must include the reserves, and! a portion of the force in the intrenchments along the road to Richmond, in the immediate neighborhood of which there is a corps of 15,000 men. At Norfolk there are 18,000 or 20,000, at Acquia Creek 8,000 to 9
y, took seventeen prisoners, fifteen horses, and returned at two o'clock this morning to Bird's Point, with a loss of one killed and six wounded. Col. Dougherty, Capt. Johnson, and Lieut.-Col. Ransom are among the wounded. Our forces under Gen. Prentiss are operating from Ironton in the direction of Hardee. J. O. Fremont, Major-General Commanding. St. Louis Democrat account. camp Lyon, August 20, 1861, Tuesday, 10 o'clock A. M. The rear-guard of the victorious Twenty-second Illi Capt. Noleman had only about forty men under his command at the time. The victory is complete. The prisoners were brought to this place this evening, and sent to the guard-house by Col. Oglesby, who commands at this point in the absence of Gen. Prentiss. We have here about sixty prisoners and a greater number of horses. The horses are said to be good ones, but the prisoners, from their looks, will have more to eat than they have been accustomed to, but they will have to perform labor on th