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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 194 68 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 74 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 44 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 44 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 24 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 24 10 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 23 1 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 17 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Rolla, Mo. (Missouri, United States) or search for Rolla, Mo. (Missouri, United States) in all documents.

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ell. There was very little firing from the musketry, as we could not get near their main body. Our men acted with the most perfect discipline. I have seen some of the best regiments in Europe in action; they cannot excel the coolness and intrepidity of our volunteers while surrounded with a superior force. I left Mount Vernon on the 7th, the second day after the battle. I carried despatches to Springfield on the 6th and returned, and on the Sunday left for St. Louis. I made the trip to Rolla, 154 miles from Mount Vernon, in twenty-nine hours. Met Gen. Sweeny three miles this side of Mount Vernon and Col. Brown thirty miles; the former with 500 men and the latter about 800. New York times' narrative. St. Louis, Wednesday, July 10, 1861. Our city was thrown into a state of feverish excitement to-day, by the news of a great battle which was reported to have been fought in the vicinity of Carthage, between the United States forces, under Col. Siegel, and the rebel trooPs
autions against surprises and flank movements — moreover, a large force of the enemy in the direction of Sarcoxie, and the necessity of keeping open his communication with Springfield — called a consultation with Brigadier-Generals Sweeney, Siegel; Majors Schofield, Shepherd, Conant, Sturgis; Captains Totten and Shaeffer, when it was determined to retire toward Springfield. This conclusion seems to be well-founded when we reflect that the provisions for such an army must be transported from Rolla at great risk (of capture. Nothing could be found either for man or horse on the track of the rebels. Hardly had the decision been declared, when one of the cavalry scouts announced that he had witnessed the departure of McCullough's camp in the direction of Sarcoxie, describing the train as long as that usually pertaining to an army of seven thousand men. On Sunday morning we retraced our steps, leaving Curran, Stone Co., the furthest point of our expedition, with reluctance at not m
rs, Army of the West, Camp Carey Gratz, near Rolla, Mo., Aug. 20, 1861. sir: I have the honor to cond brigade Mo. Vol., camp of good hope, near Rolla, August 18, 1861. General: I respectfully s at the mouth of the Little Piney to reinforce Rolla. To bring over the artillery, I ordered the fWest. Lt. Dubois' report. camp near Rolla, Mo., Aug. 17, 1861. Captain Gordon Granger, Unit Captain Steele's report. camp near Rolla, Mo., August 17, 1861. Captain: I have the hon. Report of Captain Carr. camp near Rolla, Mo., August 17, 1861. sir: Having been requesield, and the enemy are in full retreat toward Rolla. Benj. McCulloch, Brigadier-General Commandinn safety, and are now preparing to move toward Rolla, but with no hopes whatever of reaching there.the direction of Kansas, while others regarded Rolla as the more desirable. Gen. Sweeney, however,not to lose a moment, but to start at once for Rolla. They will leave before daylight. The baggag[2 more...]
d, eight hundred wounded, and thirty missing. We have possession of Springfield, and the enemy are in full retreat toward Rolla. Benj. McCulloch, Brigadier-General Commanding. Ben. McCulloch's report. Headquarters McCulloch's brigade, camphour going whiz twenty feet over our heads. Our army reached Springfield in safety, and are now preparing to move toward Rolla, but with no hopes whatever of reaching there. With a baggage train five miles long to protect, it will be singular, inden. Lyon's officers counselled such a movement. Some favored a retreat in the direction of Kansas, while others regarded Rolla as the more desirable. Gen. Sweeney, however, pointed out the disastrous results which must ensue upon retreating withoured wounded. Since arriving in town, the military authorities have decided not to lose a moment, but to start at once for Rolla. They will leave before daylight. The baggage train is about five miles long, and if the rebels do not attack and secur