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This brigade commenced the action under command of Col. Wilcox, of Michigan, who was wounded while gallantly leading his command, and whose bravery could not have been excelled, and who is now a prisoner in the hands of the enemy. While I deeply deplore the circumstances by which it became my duty to forward this report, yet it affords me much gratification to speak in terms of the highest commendation of the brave and officer-like conduct of the gentlemen composing his staff, viz.: Lieuts. Woodruff, Parker, and Edie, in their efforts to bring order out of chaos, under a most galling and deadly fire from the enemy. Having myself been in command of the Thirty-eighth regiment (Scott Life Guard, New York State Volunteers) during the action, I am unable to speak as particularly as could be desired of other regiments of the brigade from personal observation, and respectfully refer you to their respective reports. The reports of killed and wounded furnish sufficient evidence of their
x's division on the Kanawha, gives the following account of the taking possession of Barboursville, and the driving out of the secession troops by a portion of Col. Woodruff's regiment. At midnight on the night of the 12th inst., Col. Woodruff's companies A, B, D, F, and K were aroused from their slumbers, and placed under the cCol. Woodruff's companies A, B, D, F, and K were aroused from their slumbers, and placed under the command of Lieut.-Col. Neff, and, with one day's rations in their haversacks, they proceeded on their march — after a short but stirring address from Col. Woodruff. The column was conducted by a strong Union man, a resident of Barboursville, who had been driven thence some weeks since. It was proposed to make the attack at earlyCol. Woodruff. The column was conducted by a strong Union man, a resident of Barboursville, who had been driven thence some weeks since. It was proposed to make the attack at early daylight, but the deep silence observed along the route, together with the halts to send forward scouting parties, deferred their coming into sight of the enemy until the sun was two hours high. When they did catch a first glance, if there had been any fear in their composition, it would have overpowered them at once. The rebels
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 99.-battle of Scarytown, Va. Fought July 17 (search)
rived, saying that the enemy had broken, and was flying before our bayonets. This information was false. The order to break ranks was then given, after which Col. Woodruff, Col. De Villiers, Lieutenant-Colonel Neff, and Captains Sloan and Hurd left the camp to see the retreat. They rode three miles beyond the camp, being one millled, 9; wounded, 38; missing, 9. The loss of the enemy must have been fully equal to our own. The greatest misfortune of the day, however, was the loss of Col. Woodruff, Col. De Villiers, Lieut.-Col. Neff, and Captains Austin and Hurd. The Second Kentucky regiment, especially, is disconsolate at the loss of their gallant leadhave, doubtless, all been captured. They have been out twenty-four hours. The army will probably remain at this point some days. Weather very warm. Friday morning, July 19. We have just learned that Cols. Woodruff, De Villiers, and the other missing officers, are all in the rebel camp, where they are comfortably cared for.
, was sent up the river six miles to Malden, to look after a foundry at that place, said to be casting cannon for the enemy. Not finding such to be the case, she returned to Elk River. One piece of the enemy's artillery, which was disabled at Scarey Creek battle, was found at a wagon shop, in Charleston, fully repaired and ready for service. It was duly cared for, and is now one of the Union detachments. The army will commence moving at noon. Dr. Litch volunteered his services to Col. Woodruff, of the Second Kentucky regiment, when at Guyandotte. The Colonel soon placed him upon his staff. The doctor being an experienced cavalryman led the charge upon Jenkins's cavalry at the Muddy Creek bridge fight, and had them at one time surrounded; but from the imbecility of Capt. George, of the cavalry, in not closing in upon him, he made good his escape. The doctor was injured by a horse at the time, and has since been upon the medical staff, where his valuable services are fully ap
arest the position taken by General Lyon with his main force; they were instantly turned to the left and opened the battle with an incessant fire of small-arms. Woodruff opposed his battery to the battery of the enemy under Capt. Totten, and a constant cannonading was kept up between these batteries during the engagement. Heberty, McIntosh, Hebert, and McRae led their different regiments into action with great coolness and bravery, and were always in front of their men cheering them on. Woodruff and Reid managed their batteries with great ability, and did much execution. For those officers and men who were particularly conspicuous, I will refer the Depaerson, and made his last, most desperate struggle. General Parsons now advanced with his four pieces, and poured a terrific fire into the enemy's right, while Woodruff's Arkansas battery mowed down his left. At this point of time General McCulloch came up, and directed Slack's division to charge Totten's battery in front, and
y. The Missourians under Generals Slack, Clark, McBride, Parsons and Rains, were nearest the position taken by General Lyon with his main force; they were instantly turned to the left and opened the battle with an incessant fire of small-arms. Woodruff opposed his battery to the battery of the enemy under Capt. Totten, and a constant cannonading was kept up between these batteries during the engagement. Hebert's regiment of Louisiana Volunteers, and McIntosh's regiment of Arkansas Mounted Rifthe day. The commanders of regiments of my own brigade, Cols. Churchill, Greer, Embry, McIntosh, Hebert, and McRae led their different regiments into action with great coolness and bravery, and were always in front of their men cheering them on. Woodruff and Reid managed their batteries with great ability, and did much execution. For those officers and men who were particularly conspicuous, I will refer the Department to the reports of the different commanders. To my personal staff I am much
ent, in Gen. Slack's division, where he fell mortally wounded, near Totten's battery, covered all over with wounds. I received his sword to keep it from the enemy. Meanwhile, the enemy's batteries were captured by the State and Confederate forces, and routed in every direction, except on the heights west, where Lyon commanded in person, and made his last, most desperate struggle. General Parsons now advanced with his four pieces, and poured a terrific fire into the enemy's right, while Woodruff's Arkansas battery mowed down his left. At this point of time General McCulloch came up, and directed Slack's division to charge Totten's battery in front, and the Arkansas troops on the right. This was the most terrific storm of grape and musketry ever poured out upon the ranks of any American troops. On both sides the men were mowed down like the ripe harvest before the sickle. My own regiment was then decimated, and Churchill's and McIntosh's Arkansas regiments suffered most severely