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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 898 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 893 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 560 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 559 93 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 470 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 439 1 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 410 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 311 309 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 289 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 278 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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New York, Aug. 9.--A letter received in this city from Atlanta, Ga., gives this incident of the battle at Stone Bridge: A staff officer from Charleston, engaged in the battle of the 21st of July, says: I rode out the day after the battle to view the ground, and passed piles of dead in various positions. Under a large tree I saw a body lying, very handsomely dressed, with a fancy sword, and a handker-chief over the face. It attracted my curiosity. I stopped, removed the handkerchief, and saw one of the handsomest faces I ever met with, of a boy not more than twelve or fourteen years old. His appearance and dress indicated high social position; probably he was a temporary aid to some general officer. To ascertain who lie was, I examined his pockets, and found a Testament, in which was written, James Simmons, New York. From his loving mother. My son, remember thy Creator in the days of thy youth. I wished very much to take the body away, but I was six miles f
s, Who fill the hostile bands: They are men whom we have trusted, And soldiers we have known, Who, to seize the nation's honour, Have trod upon their own. O men! who've fought and conquered, With the Stars and Stripes o'erhead-- Who to greet its folds have shouted, Who to rescue them have bled-- Is this your boasted prowess, Your spirit brave and true? Keep off your caitiff fingers From the red and white and blue! “The Country is in danger!” How strange the tidings sound! How solemnly from Sumter Those heavy shots rebound! Our blessed land of Freedom Tried for her life again? Our aching hearts are sorer For the strangeness of the pain. “The Country is in danger!” But swift the answer comes! With the hum of many voices, And the distant beat of drums. Ere the proclamation's echo Has died along her shore, The Bay State men are ready To march to Baltimore. They come with steady faces, With hearts both warm and stern, Wherein the old patriot fires Have never ceased to burn: And the wome
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), 59. God save the flag of our native land. (search)
on, John Hancock swore to defend it well; At Yorktown, Bunker, and Bennington, Heroes defending it, bravely fell. Shot and sabre were nought to them, Guarding our banner, bought with blood, A scar for its sake was a diadem, Coveted nobly by field and flood. American freemen, hand to hand, A bulwark to guard it well, shall stand; God save the flag of our native land. III. Anderson guarded it through the fray, With his gallant band, all staunch and true; When a thousand years have passed away, Sumter shall loom over the waters blue, A monument true to the Stripes and Stars-- They are dear as the veins that warm the heart Crushed be the craven hand that mars Their beauty or tears the folds apart. American freemen, hand to hand, A bulwark to guard it well, shall stand; God save the flag of our native land. IV. By the shot that struck it from Moultrie's height, When Jasper restored its starry fold; If we cease to guard it by freedom's might, Let the hand be palsied, the tongue be cold! By N
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), The Richmond young men to those of New York. (search)
cy of Christian Associations, we trust, that we have secured the confidence and love of many of your members, and we are conscious that we sincerely reciprocate their sentiments. You will then regard with some respect the statements we may make in reference to the present condition of our country. Many of those who participated with us in the Christian fellowship which was exhibited by the delegates from the various portions of our beloved country, at the annual conventions held in Troy, Charleston, Richmond, Cincinnati, and New Orleans, will doubtless be willing to unite with us in an earnest effort for the restoration of peace and good — will between the contending parties. Through the distorting medium of the press, there is a misunderstanding between the North and the South as to their respective positions. If there could be a fair representation of the sentiments of the better portion of the people at the North and South, we would not present the melancholy spectacle of a gr
In Mr. Russell's sixth letter to the London Times, Written somewhere in South Carolina, he says:--From all quarters have come to my ears the echoes of the same voice, * * * the chorus that rings through the State of Sumter, Pinckney, and Marion --* * * That voice says: If we could only get one of the royal race of England to rule over us, we should be content! Pray, who has been poking fun at our clever visitor, after this fashion? To soft-solder a foreigner to a moderate extent, may be y get one of the royal race of England to rule over us, we should be content! Pray, who has been poking fun at our clever visitor, after this fashion? To soft-solder a foreigner to a moderate extent, may be excusable on the score of politeness; but when such broad humbugs as this are palmed off on intelligent travellers, really it is too bad. We think the chorus of the State of Sumter, Pinckney, and Marion, has been guilty of a positive discourtesy toward Mr. Russell.--Savannah Republican.
gather! they gather! &c. They've roused the old lion, Scott, out of his lair; No claw lined with cotton for Dixie is there! He'll chase that fox, Davis, in front of his host, And send him with Haman to wander, twin ghost; While President Lincoln is valiant and bold, To deal with opposers, like Abra'am of old; His sword upon tyrants the patriarch drew, Redeeming his kinsman--our Abra'am will too! They gather! they gather! &c. Our country is calling; wake, sons of the true! The storm of Fort Sumter was thundered at you; Each shell that whizzed there, and each traitorous gun, Was aimed at the banners your fathers have won. Then gather! then gather! &c. Yet pause in your songs, let the banners float low, Half-mast o'er the turf, while a nation's tears flow! As young Zouaves in the soil which he loved make a grave For their golden-souled leader — young Ellsworth the brave. When bearing the olive of freedom and peace, Our Eagle, returning, bids slaughter to cease, Shall History place
t them alone, when the cannon's loud thunder Shall cease to be heard on the smoke-covered plain, And the army of traitors is driven asunder, To rally in future time never again. We'll let them alone, when the contest is ended, And the fall of Fort Sumter is fully avenged; When the Stars and the Stripes every stronghold shall cover, And the fires of treason forever are quenched. We'll let them alone, in their dark shame forever, When every nation with scorn shall review The ruin of those who hreview The ruin of those who had thus dared to sever The proudest Republic the world ever knew! We'll let them alone, when our cannon have written In deeply-carved letters, on Sumter's thick wall, The story of how the mad “biter was bitten,” And who lost the day in the great game of ball. We'll let them alone, when from Maine to the waters Of grand old Pacific, the paean shall ring From millions of Freedom's proud sons and fair daughters: the Union forever — no Cotton is King! Easton,
ct and enthusiasm for that flag which for so many years has been the symbol of might, freedom, and charity. The following toasts were drank upon the occasion:-- 1.--Abe Lincoln, the honest old miller; while he separates the chaff from the wheat, his grinding shall be done Scott free. 2.--old Abe shall be another link on (Lincoln) to our chain of Government supporters. 3.--Liholiho and Emma — the King and Queen of these islands. Heaven bless them. 4.--Let the gallant defender of Sumter have prefixed to his name Columbia; and future generations shall often look back with pride upon Columbia Anderson, (and her son.) 5.--the secession States--the corrode of a Republic. Shake off the rust, and the steel will pierce the keener. 6.--(Drank standing, and in silence.) Col. Ellsworth. A bright light quenched in the hour of deepest darkness. After the toasts had been disposed of, the company listened to some pertinent and patriotic remarks from the orator of the day, Cap
e eagle's flight? Does she bear in her beak the Stripes and the Stars, The device which was won by a thousand scars? Then shout, as it floats through the cloud in the breeze 'Tis the aegis of Hope on the land and the seas. Blackness and night I see! Ho, rally! ho, rally! our banner is rent, And the hiss of the viper now sounds in our tent; Black Treason grows rampant, and vaunts that she drives The flag-bearing Eagle away from her skies! Freedom or Slavery, Is the watchword that booms from Sumter's black walls; And Freedom or Death, answer hack Northern Halls! To Freedom or Death! is the shout and the cry; By the Banner of Freedom 'tis glory to die! Blackness and night I see! And the trumpings that break 'mid the cloud and the storm, And the marshalling feet of the hosts as they form, Like a hurricane bred on the tempest's red track, Now warn of the wreck and the woe in their track. Foemen, beware! beware! Of the storm that disturbs the bald eagle's high nest; There mutters a wrath
The 85th anniversary of the Battle of Fort Moultrie was handsomely celebrated in Charleston on the 28th of June. Business was almost entirely suspended, military companies paraded, the streets were crowded, and there were all the observances of a gala day.--Idem.
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