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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 149 3 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 125 9 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 92 6 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 88 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 83 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 70 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 53 5 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 51 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 41 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for William Nelson or search for William Nelson in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 6 document sections:

Doc. 93. Gen. Nelson's proclamation. To the People of Northeastern Kentucky now in arms against their National and State Governments: Fellow-citizens: You have assembled together in arms against your Government, against your State, your neighbors, and in some instances your nearest relatives, without any cause, or any object that is worthy of brave and good men. What has your country done that you should rise against it, or what good will it do you to murder the people, burn and pillever more hope to see in safety your families or enjoy your property, until you have carried out the purpose of your wicked misleaders, and conquered the people of your State and overthrown the Government of your fathers. As your fellow-citizen and a native of your State, I urge this offer upon you; should you reject it, the enlightened world, as well as the laws of your country, will hold you alone responsible for the shedding of fraternal blood. Wm. Nelson, Brig.-Gen. October, 17, 1861.
He had been detailed to act as an escort for Capt. Konkles' battery, and his orders were to see the battery safe into General Nelson's command, and then to return, unless wanted for special service for a day or two. Capt. Laughlin has expected to serhe people at West Liberty were more reconciled. They had received a lesson. Col. Harris was expecting orders to join Gen. Nelson, to take part in the expedition to Prestonburg. Gen. Nelson was at Hazel Green with two regiments of Ohio troops, andGen. Nelson was at Hazel Green with two regiments of Ohio troops, and Colonel Metcalf's Kentuckians, and there was another regiment of Ohians at Mount Sterling, pressing forward. Colonel Harris was within thirty-five miles of Prestonburg, and Gen. Nelson ten or fifteen miles south of Col. Harris, and about the same Gen. Nelson ten or fifteen miles south of Col. Harris, and about the same distance from Prestonburg. It was reported that the rebels were about three thousand strong at that place, and without artillery, though it was undertsood that six pieces for them were on the way through the mountains of Virginia. Col. Harris' reg
— H. E. Read, G. W. Maxson. Henry — B. W. Jenkins. Hopkins — L. M. Lowe, C. S. Greene. Jefferson — John Jones. Larue — J. S. Churchill. Logan — R. Browder, G. T. Edwards, W. M. Clark. City of Louisville — J. D. Pope, B. H. Hornsby, J. G. Gorsuch, W. Johnston, E. D. Ricketts, Blanton Duncan, Henry Gray, H. W. Bruce, R. McKee. Marshall — I. C. Gilbert. Marion — G. S. Miller. Meade — J. P. Walton, J. S. Taylor. Mercer — Philip B. Thompson. Muhlenburg — H. D. Lothrop, R. S. Russell. Nelson — J. D. Elliott, J. C. Wickliffe. Oldham--Mr. Miller, J. R. Gathright. Ohio--Dr. W. G. Mitchell, F. W. Forman. Scott — G. W. Johnson. Shelby--Colonel Jack Allen, J. F. Davis. Spencer — T. L. Burnett. Todd — James A. Russell, W. B. Harrison. Trigg — Mat. McKinney, H. C. Burnett. Washington — Pat. Symmes. Lyon — W. B. Machen, R. L. Cobb. McCracken — W. Bullitt. McLean--Rev. Joseph Gregory, J. S. Morton. Garrard — J. P. Burnside, G. R. Davis. On
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 131. General Nelson's proclamation, on occupying Prestonburg, Kentucky. (search)
ith the forces under my command, I declare to all whom it may concern: That the jurisdiction of the State of Kentucky is restored in this section of the State, and that the regular fall terms of the courts will be held in those counties in which the time for holding the same has not passed. All the civil officers are ordered to attend at the times and places of holding said courts, and attend to the duties of their respective offices. Given under my hand, this 5th day of November, 1861 W. Nelson. By command of Brig.-Gen. Nelson, Jno. M. Duke, Aide-de-Camp. The Maysville (Ky.) Eagle, of November 9th, contains the following account of the occupation: Paintville, November 6th, 1861. Bro. Coons: Since writing you on Saturday, the object of our mission to this region has been attained. Our gallant Col., Leonidas Metcalfe, with twenty-nine other gallant and daring spirits, went up from this place to Prestonburg on yesterday, and took possession of it. It had been impossibl
ed marches over wretched roads, deep in mud; badly clad, you have bivouacked on the wet ground in the November rains without a murmur. With scarce half rations, you have pressed forward with unfailing perseverance. The only place that the enemy made a stand, though ambushed and very strong, you drove him from in the most brilliant style. For your constancy and courage I thank you, and with the qualities which you have shown that you possess, I expect great things from you in the future. W. Nelson. Secession report: report of Colonel Williams. Camp near pound Gap, Nov. 13, 1861. General: Since my last report to you, I have been compelled to abandon Piketon by an overwhelming force, that advanced upon me in two columns--one directly up the river from Prestonburg, sixteen hundred strong, with a battery of six pieces; and the other from Louisa, up John's Creek, a branch of the Sandy, numbering one thousand eight hundred men, with a battery of field-pieces. Both of these co
ically employed in collecting forage. It is proper to mention that, deeming it necessary to leave one of my staff at Headquarters to superintend the telegraph, and to order forward the reserve, viz: the Second brigade and three squadrons of cavalry, if required, the lot fell upon my aide-de-camp, Lieutenant Elbridge Maconkey, who discharged the responsible duty entirely to my satisfaction. Seven prisoners were taken, whose names, &c., are as follows: Corporal Ferris E. Long, and privates Wm. Nelson and Patrick Hughes, of the First Kentucky regiment, and privates Robert R. Moss, Ira Channey, William Morris, and J. Williamson, of the Tenth Alabama regiment. The want of ambulances was felt on this occasion, and I would respectfully suggest that a few more be ordered to each regiment of my division, as I was unable, for want of transport, to bring from the field all the wounded prisoners taken in the affair. Those left I had placed in comfortable quarters in Dranesville, where t