hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 456 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 154 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 72 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 64 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 58 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 54 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 40 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 38 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 36 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Delaware (Delaware, United States) or search for Delaware (Delaware, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

shows no signs of life. Off Washington Point, or at Kettle Bellows, we passed the Government transport City of New York, bound to Washington with supplies. As we approached Blackstone lighthouse, ninety miles from Washington, we came in sight of a large number of trading vessels, heading up stream, and in all instances giving the Virginia shore a wide berth. Off Cape Lookout there were one Government gunboat and a number of trading vessels, the latter heading up the Chesapeake. At three o'clock P. M. the Potomac was left behind, and all excitement began to subside. As the light-houses on Capes Charles and Henry are both in Virginia, these have not been lit since the secession of the State. At Rappahannock River we found the U. S. steamer Monticello on watch. After a voyage of forty-eight hours we reached New York. So little is there now doing along the coast, that we did not meet one vessel between Cape Henry and the Capes of Delaware. --National Intelligencer, Sept. 5.
constitutional provisions in regard to the militia) acted as agents of the General Government, in raising volunteers for the general defence, and in clothing, arming, equipping, and supplying them; but even in this matter, not, it is believed, beyond their own people and territory. Some of the points important for the maritime defence of Pennsylvania are situated in other States. It could not, of course, be expected that the authorities of this Commonwealth should go into New Jersey or Delaware to erect fortifications. If they are to be erected by the concurrent action of the several States immediately concerned, an agreement among them would be necessary to determine what should be done, and what proportion of the expense of doing it should be borne by each. No such agreement could be lawfully made without the action of the several State Legislatures, and the Constitution expressly prohibits its being made at all without the assent of Congress. To pay the expenses of the
tes, has given a very accurate definition of the phrase alien enemies, as used in the act, in these words: The following persons are subject to the operation of the law as alien enemies: 1. All citizens of the United States except citizens of Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky or Missouri, or the District of Columbia, or the Territories of New Mexico, Arizona, or the Indian Territory south of Kansas. 2. All persons who have a domicile within the States with which this Government is at war, no mas of Great Britain, France, or other neutral nations, who have a domicil or are carrying on business or traffic within the States at war with the Confederacy, are alien enemies under the law. 3. All such citizens or residents of the States of Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky or Missouri, and the Territories of New Mexico, Arizona, and the Indian Territory south of Kansas, and of the District of Columbia, as shall commit actual hostilities against the Confederate States, or aid or abet the United
r that the quietude of any firesides will be disturbed, unless the disturbance is caused by yourselves. Special directions have been given not to interfere with the condition of any person held to domestic servitude, and in order that there may be no ground for mistake or pretext for misrepresentation, commanders of regiments or corps have been instructed not to permit such persons to come within their lines. The command of the expedition is intrusted to Brig.-Gen. Henry H. Lockwood, of Delaware--a State identical in some of the distinctive features of its social organization with your own. Portions of his force come from counties in Maryland bordering on one of yours. From him and from them you may be assured of the sympathy of near neighbors, as well as friends, if you do not repel it by hostile resistance or attack. This mission is to assert the authority of the United States, to reopen your intercourse with the loyal States, and especially with Maryland, which has just proc
hereby invited by said States, and upon the meeting of the joint commission for the purpose of conference as aforesaid, active hostilities shall cease and be suspended; and shall not be renewed unless said commission shall be unable to agree, or in case of an agreement by them, said agreement shall be rejected either by Congress or by the aforesaid States. Rebel opinions of the resolutions. Our readers will find in our columns to-day, the preamble and resolutions of Mr. Saulsbury, of Delaware, offered in the Senate of the United States, proposing to put an end to the revolt, by appointing commissioners to confer with commissioners to be appointed by the Confederate States, for the preservation of the Union and the maintenance of the Constitution. Here is reconstruction proposed, more formidable, perhaps, to the liberties and the lasting peace of the Confederate States, than cannon and bayonets. As the action proposed is by the Congress of the United States, it must be met, we