Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for New York (New York, United States) or search for New York (New York, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Doc. 30. speech of Governor Andrew, at New York, September 5, 1861, on the occasion of the reception of the Massachusetts Twentieth regiment. Mr. Chairman and gentlemen: This occasion in no sense, and by no right, is mine. No part of its honors pertains to me. Here, present in the city of New York, called by engagements which pertained to my duty, I have the happiness to find myself in a position to be enabled to unite with you in doing honor to the Twentieth regiment of Massachusetts Volunteers, (cheers,) commanded by my friend Colonel Lee, (applause, and three cheers for Colonel Lee,) who, with generous devotion and patriotic alacrity, without a moment's delay or hesitation, drew his sword, at my invitation, to lead a regiment of Massachusetts soldiers — citizens, of brave and accomplished officers and brave men. Upon the heads of such as they Divine Providence will pour its benignest benediction, and upon their memories the most fragrant gratitude of our posterity shall rest.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 36. battle of Port Royal, S. C. Fought November 7, 1861. (search)
, and behaved very gallantly. Beaufort has been taken by the gunboats, the town having been abandoned by the whites. The negroes were pillaging the town. They said the whites were shooting them right and left, in order to drive them back into the interior. A boat which came off to the Seneca said one man, giving his name, shot six of the negroes. John Rogers. Letter from General Viele. The following letter was received by the Secretary of the Union Defence Committee in the city of New York: Beaufort harbor, S. C., November 9. dear sir: The first result of the expedition to the Atlantic coast is the occupation of this harbor, the capture of Forts Walker and Beauregard--the former mounting twenty-three and the latter sixteen guns, all of the heaviest calibre and most approved pattern for sea-coast defence — some of them rifled, and several of English manufacture, lately imported. The rebel forces were commanded by General Drayton and Colonels Heywood and Dunovan
to Southampton to land the crew of the Harvey Birch. James Stewart, Second Officer. Protest of Captain Nelson. The following is the protest of Captain W. H. Nelson, master of the Harvey Birch: I, William Henry Nelson, of the city of New York, in the United States of America, Master Mariner, do solemnly, sincerely, and truly swear that I sailed from the said city of New York, on the 20th day of September last, as master of, and in, the ship Harvey Birch, of New York, a ship ownedcity of New York, on the 20th day of September last, as master of, and in, the ship Harvey Birch, of New York, a ship owned and registered in New York, in conformity with the laws of the United States, bound for the port of Havre de Grace, in France, with a cargo consisting of wheat. About the 9th day of October I arrived at Havre, and having discharged the cargo of my ship and ballasted her, I sailed in her again for the port of New York, on the 16th day of November, first having received the register, crew list, articles, and all papers belonging to the ship in proper form from the United States consul there. On