Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Floyd or search for Floyd in all documents.

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Anecdote of Floyd.--The following anecdote is told of Floyd, the great Virginian: A few years since a gentleman residing in Richmond, Va., gave a large dinner party to some distinguished men, amoFloyd, the great Virginian: A few years since a gentleman residing in Richmond, Va., gave a large dinner party to some distinguished men, among whom was Floyd, then a rising man, but whose personal appearance indicated neither mental nor physical superiority, he being a pursy, dark-complexioned man, with crispy, wiry hair. Among the distFloyd, then a rising man, but whose personal appearance indicated neither mental nor physical superiority, he being a pursy, dark-complexioned man, with crispy, wiry hair. Among the distinguished guests were two Indian chiefs, returning from a visit to their Great father, the President — magnificent specimens of their race. Floyd, thinking to compliment them and make them at their Floyd, thinking to compliment them and make them at their ease, told them in a condescending manner, that he could boast of Indian blood in his veins, being a descendant of Pocahontas. One of the chiefs, drawing him-self up majestically and disdainfully, ale countenance, said in broken English, Ugh! No! No! nigur! Nigur! The confusion and dismay of Floyd was complete, and it required all the boasted politeness of Richmond to keep the other guests fr
73. Floyd's defeat by Rosecrans. A double thief and traitor he, Whose heart is so unlike a man's, As first to rob the Treasury, Then steal away from Rosecrans! --Richard Coe, Philadelphia Bulletin.
Col. Croghan--The death of Col. Croghan, who was killed by Gen. Benham's command, in the retreat of Floyd from Kanawha, is no small loss to the rebels. He was an excellent officer, a noble-looking man, and formerly in the regular service, a graduate of West Point, and a class-mate of Gen. Benham. He was a son of Gen. Croghan, the defender of Fort Stephenson, and was formerly quite wealthy, once owning the Mammoth Cave in Kentucky. On his death-bed he confessed that he had received only what he deserved — that he was wrong — and asked them to pray for him. He refused to allow any medical assistance, probably well aware his time was come. The meeting and recognition between him and Gen. Benham was painful to witness. Said the General: My God, Croghan! is this you? Yes, said the dying man; but for God's sake, Benham, do not reproach me — I know now I was in the wrong. Hearing the cannonading, he remarked: General, you can do me no good, and you are wanted ov<
old Uncle Sam, a good old fellow in the main. Of whom the world might say, That still a godly race he ran Whene'er he went to pay. Variation--“Would always work and pay.” A kind and gentle heart he had, To comfort friends and foes; The naked every day he clad-- When he put on his clothes. Variation--“With cotton underclothes.” And in that town a dog It is not known what dog is meant here; many think that President Buchanan is without doubt alluded to, but they forget the claim of Floyd. The question at this late day will have to be left in doubt. Had the author said old hound, no doubt would exist--“curs of low degree,” however, would include all secession. was found-- As many dogs there be-- Both mongrel, puppy, whelp, and hound, And curs of low degree. This dog and man at first were friends, But when a pique began, The dog, to gain his private ends, Went mad, and bit the man. The dog crept up and sneakingly bit Uncle Sam deep. Around, from all the neighboring