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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The Daily Dispatch: September 14, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 6, 1861., [Electronic resource] 7 5 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 2, 1861., [Electronic resource] 7 1 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 6 2 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 6 6 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 6 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 8, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 4 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Stringham or search for Stringham in all documents.

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ly. Why, he exclaimed, you astonish me. I thought that to capture these forts it would cost a thousand lives, and it would be cheap at that. When Commodore Barron and his officers descended to the deck of the flag-ship Minnesota, where Commodore Stringham was stationed on the quarter-deck to receive him, Gen. Butler presented Barron to the gallant old Commodore, saying, Commodore Barron! Commodore Stringham. The latter, raising himself up to his full height, looked the traitor straight in Commodore Stringham. The latter, raising himself up to his full height, looked the traitor straight in the eye, and barely inclining his head, replied, I have seen Mr. Barron before. Barron, who has always prided himself on the hauteur monde, fairly winced under the whole volume of honest sarcasm contained in that look and sentence. It was a touching sight. On the one side stood the manly old tar, who will die as he has lived, under that glorious flag that has flung its crimson folds over his head on every sea, waiting to tread the shore and receive the grateful plaudits and loving thanks o