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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,078 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 442 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 430 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 324 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 306 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 284 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 254 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 150 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Maryland (Maryland, United States) or search for Maryland (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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9. Southern war-song. by N. P. W. To horse! to horse! our standard flies, The bugles sound the call; An alien navy stems our seas-- The voice of battle's on the breeze; Arouse ye, one and all! From beauteous Southern homes we come, A band of brothers true, Resolved to fight for liberty, And live or perish with our flag-- The noble red and blue. Though tamely crouch to Northern frown, Kentucky's tardy train; Though invaded soil, Maryland mourns, Though brave Missouri vainly spurns, And foaming gnaws the chain. Oh! had they marked the avenging call Their brethren's insults gave, Disunion ne'er their ranks had mown, Nor patriot valor, desperate grown, Sought freedom in the grave. Shall we, too, bend the stubborn head, In Freedom's temple born?-- Dress our pale cheek in timid smiles, To hail a master in our house, Or brook a victor's scorn? No! though destruction o'er the land Come pouring as a flood; The sun that sees our falling day, Shall mark our sabre's deadly sway, And set tha
ll McCullough's onset, And the tyrant general's fate! Then say not the “God of battles” Disregards the Freemen's right, For He, in mercy, smiles on all 'Neath the “Crimson and the White.” VIII. Then, arise! arise, ye Southrons, Let your cry be for the brave, And, oh! if perchance in battle You should meet a “soldier's grave;” Be content to die for freedom, 'Gainst the thraldom of the foe; With your “White and Crimson” banner Floating high above you-go! IX. And you'll shout at last triumphant O'er the Abolition band, Who, alas! usurps the power O'er the laws of Maryland; And when at last her sons are free, How gallantly they'll fight For their firesides and laws of State, 'Neath the “Crimson and the White.” X. Missouri, too, will “fall in line,” Kentucky--Tennessee-- And e'en will little Delaware, Determined to be free! Then will the retribution come-- “Revenge!” in every mouth, And tyrants fall with shame before “the Banner of the South.” Fair
53. down-trodden Maryland. by B. air--Tom Bowling. Down-trodden, despised, see brave Maryland lie, The noblest of all States; Up and to ransom her let each one try, To hasten the plans of the Fates. Her land is of the greatest beauty That e'er the eye gazed on; Fearless she roused her to her duty, Nor paused she till ‘twas done. From her, her Old Line has departed, With leaders true and brave; She's been of all the truest hearted-- Why suffer her to be a slave? She's waited long with murmuMaryland lie, The noblest of all States; Up and to ransom her let each one try, To hasten the plans of the Fates. Her land is of the greatest beauty That e'er the eye gazed on; Fearless she roused her to her duty, Nor paused she till ‘twas done. From her, her Old Line has departed, With leaders true and brave; She's been of all the truest hearted-- Why suffer her to be a slave? She's waited long with murmurs deep, Aye calling on ye oft; Still traitors on her insults heap, Still lies her hope aloft. But yet she hopes for better things, When Jeff, who all commands, This wanton war to an end quick brings, With peace to our Southern lands. And when the South is free once more, 'Twill be her proudest boast, That forth the first her men did pour, To curb the invading host. Baltimore, Nov. 18. 186
An incident.--As the fleet of transports was passing down the Chesapeake Bay to Hampton Roads, on that beautiful day in October when we first got under weigh at Annapolis, a large bald eagle came sweeping out from the shore of Maryland, and soaring high in air above the fleet, finally alighted on the masthead of the Atlantic, the Headquarters of the army. In an instant all eves were upon him, and conjectures were busy as to whether he were a loyal bird, come to give his blessing at parting, or a secession rooster, intent on spying out our strength. We gave the bird the benefit of the doubt; an officer peremptorily stayed the hand of a soldier who would have shot him, and we accepted the omen as auguring the full success of our enterprise.--Leavenworth (Kansas) Times, Nov. 22.
ired, when the kind-faced stranger, after a word or two of further conversation, asked him if he would not accept a piece of his pie. The sentinel thanked him with heartfelt gratitude, and ate the pie. Shortly afterward he was seized with convulsions, and was carried by his comrades to the hospital tent. The physician of the regiment found that he was poisoned with strychnine. One of these rebel Borgias, however, met a sudden fate, a few days since, in the Federal camp at Buckey's Town, Maryland. A correspondent tells the story: Yesterday the owner of the farm on which the army is encamped was seized and shot without trial. He raged fearfully when they quartered on his land, and utterly refused to sell his hay at any price, and finally carried his spite so far as to attempt to poison a spring from which the soldiers obtained a large supply. He was arrested in the act, with the damning evidences of his guilt upon him, and was shot without benefit of clergy. --Alb. Journal
A rebel heroine.--The Richmond correspondent of the Nashville Union tells the following: Not long ago I told you of the sufferings of Miss Converse on her trip from Philadelphia. I have now to record another instance of female heroism. A young lady of Maryland, as gentle and genuine a woman as the South contains, but withal a true heroine, has, after braving many hardships, recently arrived here. Reaching the Potomac, she found a boat and a negro to row it, but the negro refused to attempt to cross, for fear, as he said, the Yankees would shoot him. Drawing a pitsol from her pocket, our heroine told him coolly she would shoot him herself if he didn't cross. The negro quailed, rowed her over to the Virginia shore, and thus, utterly alone, she came to her friends in Richmond, with her petticoats quilted with quinine, her satchel full of letters, many of them containing money, and with no end of spool-thread, needles, pins, and other little conveniences now so hard to get in the
neutrals affords the greatest mirth-- To the Southrons; but the Yankees will ever hate the fame Which gave to Wilkes and Fairfax their never-dying name. Throughout the North their Captain Wilkes received his meed of praise, For doing — in these civilized — the deeds of darker days; But England's guns will thunder along the Yankee coast, And show the abolitionists too soon they made their boast. Then while Old England's cannon are booming on the sea, Our Johnston, Smith, and Beauregard, dear Maryland will free, And Johnston in Kentucky will whip the Yankees too, And start them to the lively tune of “Yankee Doodle-doo.” Then down at Pensacola, where the game is always “Bragg,” The “Stars and Stripes” will be pulled down, and in the dust be dragged; Fort Pickens can't withstand us, when Braxton is the cry, And there you'll see the Yankees, with their usual speed will fly. On the coast of Dixie's kingdom there are batteries made by Lee, And covered up with cotton, which the Yanke
Maryland, O Maryland! The following song was written as a substitute for Maryland, my Maryland Maryland, my Maryland : The traitor's foot is on thy shore, Maryland, O Maryland! He whispers treason at thy door, MarylanMaryland, O Maryland! His minions crowd old Baltimore; Her streets are stained with patriot gore; Her Unionise thee with the traitor's heel? Maryland, O Maryland! Are all thy loyal sires of old, Maryland, Oo sleep beneath thy sacred mould, Maryland, O Maryland! Forgotten like a tale that's told, While thed, O Maryland! Virginia has forged her chain, Maryland, O Maryland! Hark, how it clanks o'er hill anryland! Well may the crimson stain thy cheek, Maryland, O Maryland! That thou shouldst be so basely the skies, And, ere thy day of doom, be wise, Maryland, O Maryland! Gird on thy armor for the fight,, O Maryland! On for the Union and the right, Maryland, O Maryland! Be no more dead, or deaf, or dum the bugle and the drum; “Huzza! she breathes! she burns! she'll come!” Maryland, our Maryland! [42 more...]<