Browsing named entities in Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler. You can also browse the collection for 23rd or search for 23rd in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 5: Baltimore and Fortress Monroe. (search)
for secession I feel very sure the other point of which they will take possession will be Manassas Junction. They will not do that immediately, but will wait until the vote by the people is taken by Virginia to secede, which is fixed to be on the 23d. General Scott, being a Virginian, I know is very anxious not to move on her sacred soil until after that vote. But the rebel government is now coming to Richmond as the capital of the Confederacy, so certain are they of the result of the vote ofbe ready? Mansfield has satisfied me that we want at least ten thousand additional troops to give security to the capital. Now, I had learned, and so I supposed had Scott, that Lee, having taken command of the Army of Northern Virginia on the 23d, had, by general order of that date, ordered his forces at Alexandria and along the Potomac to act on the defensive, and to go into camps of instruction and collect men and provisions; and what Mansfield wanted with ten thousand more troops to ass
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 8: from Hatteras to New Orleans. (search)
for each shell, irrespective of the expense of exploding them as fireworks. Still there was no sensible diminution of the fire of the forts. Farragut had at first determined to make his attempt to run past the forts on the early morning of the 23d, the sixth day of the bombardment, but was delayed. The fire of the mortars on the sixth day was slow; the forts answered not a gun. The men at mast-head, with their glasses, descried twelve rebel steamers around the bend above the forts. The dagreat efforts to put them in trim, which was finally done. The chain cables of the gunboats and ships were fastened in festoons up and down the sides of the vessels on both sides, so as to protect the engines and boilers. On the evening of the 23d, arrangements were made for the fleet in five divisions to take part in running by the forts. The mortar boats were to remain in position, and aid the attack with the quickest fire possible. How quick that fire was, I had personal inspection. F
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 12: administration of finances, politics, and justice.--recall. (search)
of each and all have passed into history, but they were not such solely from the fault of Banks, by any means. Having received no further orders, I wrote to the President, either to report to the commander-in-chief, or otherwise, I have taken the liberty to suppose that I am permitted to return home, my services being no longer needed here. I have given Major-General Banks all the information in my power, and more than he has asked, in relation to the affairs of this department. On the 23d, I had a public leave-taking of my troops and friends. A very large number of both soldiers and citizens collected. For two hours and more there was a continuous throng passing by where I stood and shaking me by the hand. General Banks and officers paid their respects, and Admiral Farragut was there with nearly all of the principal officers of his fleet. On the morning of the 24th, the levee at which my transport lay was covered with a large concourse of citizens. No troops were there,
d already waited that time, to wit: from the 9th, the day on which we were ready to sail, to the 19th. On the 20th, Tuesday, 21st, Wednesday, 22d, Thursday, and 23d, Friday, it blew a gale. I was occupied in coaling and watering the transport fleet at Beaufort. The Baltic, having a large supply of coal, was enabled to remain at the place of rendezvous, with a brigade on board of twelve hundred men, and General Ames reported to Admiral Porter that he would co-operate with him. On the 23d, I sent Captain Clarke, of my staff, from Beaufort, on the fast-sailing armed steamer Chamberlain, to Admiral Porter, to inform him that on the evening of the 24th I would again be at the rendezvous with the transport fleet, for the purpose of commencing the attack, the weather permitting. At four o'clock, on the evening of the 24th, I came in sight of Fort Fisher, and found the naval fleet engaged in bombarding, the powder vessel having been exploded on the morning previous about one o'cl