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John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 374 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 130 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 113 13 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 74 8 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 65 15 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 61 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 59 7 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 52 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 42 2 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 37 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler. You can also browse the collection for Richard Taylor or search for Richard Taylor in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 6 document sections:

Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 2: early political action and military training. (search)
ery soldier of that day. On it is engraved with his own knife, Zephaniah Butler his horn April ye 22, 1758. And Captain Zephaniah fought with Stark at Bennington. Then followed the Revolution, from 1775 to 1783, and one of my uncles was at Bunker Hill. The next generation saw the war of 1812 with Great Britain. In this war, my father, John Butler, commanded a company of light dragoons in the regular army. Next, in 1830, were the Spanish wars in Florida and the Gulf States, wherein General Taylor and General Jackson--then captains — so distinguished themselves. Next came the unpleasantness of 1861 to 1865, which, I think, in spite of the euphemism, might well be termed a war of our generation, and with which, it may be seen hereafter, I had somewhat to do. Therefore, believing that there could be no war in which a son of mine especially would not take a part in his generation, I had him educated at West Point, so that his efforts for his country might not be thwarted by the o
il platform, which prohibited thereafterwards the admission of any State which had established the institution of slavery by its constitution. The party had strength enough to defeat Cass, the Democratic candidate for President, and thus elected Taylor, the Whig candidate, a Southern slaveholder. The Abolitionists had put up a candidate for President at previous elections, but their vote was so small that it was never a factor in the political result. Taylor lived but fifteen months after hTaylor lived but fifteen months after his inauguration in 1849, and Vice-President Millard Fillmore became President. Under the Missouri compromise act, it was provided that other States coming in thereafterwards might be admitted as free States if such was the wish of the people forming the new States. Near the close of Fillmore's administration a new compromise measure was passed, which included the fugitive slave act. The original law, passed in the early days of the republic, was to be executed through tile medium of State offi
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 6: contraband of War, Big Bethel and Hatteras. (search)
. General Butler will report, as soon as he has his troops prepared, to Flag-Officer Stringham, and he will be ready to embark at one o'clock to-morrow. As soon as the object of the expedition is attained the detachment will return to Fortress Monroe. Captain Tallmadge, chief quartermaster, will provide a detachment of eight hundred and sixty men for the expedition to Hatteras Inlet, with a suitable quantity of water for ten days consumption, and the chief commissary of subsistence, Captain Taylor, will provide it with rations for the same length of time. These officers will report the execution of these orders by ten o'clock to-morrow if possible. By command of Major-General Wool: C. C. Churchill, First Lieutenant, Third Artillery, Act. Asst. Adjt.-Gen. Armed with the order we left Fortress Monroe at one o'clock on Monday, August 26. The last ship of our fleet but the Cumberland arrived at Hatteras about 4 o'clock on Tuesday afternoon. We went to work landing troops tha
portant character. His great success in that, and his career afterwards during the whole war, fully justified the appointment. On the 25th of October, I organized an expedition by a brigade composed of five regiments of infantry, two batteries of artillery, and four companies of cavalry. This force was to move up the western bank of the Mississippi and through West Louisiana, for the purpose of capturing and occupying that territory and dispersing the forces assembled there under Gen. Richard Taylor, and then to send a detachment to occupy Galveston. The plan was for Weitzel to go up the river as far as Donaldsonville, capture and fortify that point, move west of Berwick Bay, and, with the aid of the light draught steamers which I had bought or captured, seize all the waters of Southern Louisiana west of New Orleans. On the same day, I pushed forward from Algiers a column consisting of the Eighth Vermont Volunteers and the First Regiment of Native Guards (colored). They were
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 18: why I was relieved from command. (search)
A few — but not too many — of those officers read military books. It is wonderful how soon this claim of theirs burst out after the war commenced, and even then how little ambition for fighting these men had. I was sent as major-general commanding to Fortress Monroe on the 22d of May, 1861, and I was told by General Scott that I was fortunate in having there some sixteen young officers who would aid me in organizing troops. Now, of those sixteen young men, ten had had relations with General Taylor, who was commissary general of the army, and they at once got detailed to positions in the commissary department where they could buy pork and beans for the army, which was thought to be a very soft place. Four of the others got detailed into the quartermaster-general's department, where they could buy mules and hire steamboats. Two more of them got into the adjutant-general's department, where they sat at desks. There were three or four older officers,--one of whom was the lamented G
m, 640. Sumner, Charles, how elected Senator, 116, 117, 131; letters to Butler concerning New Orleans removal, 552. Sutter vs. the United States, 1007. Swayne, Judge, reference to, 995. T Tabb, Col., Thos., aids Butler in befriending Mrs. Mumford, 444. Taliaferro's Cavalry, reference to, 679. Taney, Chief Justice, issues habeas corpus, 1009. Tarbox, Hon. John K., Butler's congressional Democratic opponent, 926; insurance commissioners of Massachusetts, 975. Taylor, Gen., Richard, commanding in Western Louisiana, 495; reference to, 864. Tenth New York Regiment, 280. Tenth Army Corps embark at Yorktown, 639; attacked, 649; repulse Beauregard's attack at Bermuda Hundred, 665; seized Deep Bottom, 694; reference, 699; expedition against Newmarket Heights, 717, 718; Butler's orders regarding expedition against Richmond to, 722, 730; start on expedition, 730; capture Newmarket Heights, 731, 733; reference, 858. Terminal Annuities, system of, 957, 960. Ter