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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 898 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 893 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 560 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 559 93 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 470 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 439 1 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 410 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 311 309 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 289 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 278 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler. You can also browse the collection for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 28 results in 13 document sections:

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ecame reputable and somewhat distinguished citizens. The remaining one is the writer. The Rev. Mr. Edson was the foster father of this school, and brought for us our teacher, Thomas N. Clark, a graduate of Yale. Mr. Clark taught us for nearly two years, and with him we went into the new schoolhouse. The numbers of the school increasing with the same rapidity as the new town, he brought to his assistance a classmate from Yale, Mr. Clapp, who afterwards left our school to go to Charleston, South Carolina, where he finally became the editor of the Charleston Mercury. He was the most bitter proslavery and states-right gentleman I ever knew, and his cutting sarcasms permeated every page of his writing. In his early life he happened to be bitten in the heel by a rattlesnake. He did not die from the bite, but those whom he did not like said the venom of the poison remained in him. For some reason, which as a boy I never knew, the school was suspended when Mr. Clark retired from the t
settlement of Kansas the John Brown raid Democratic national convention at Charleston in 1860 struggle for a platform South Carolina delegates leave the conventitional law. The Democratic National Convention of 1860 was held at Charleston, South Carolina. To this convention I was a delegate, as I had been to every nationaof coming down here and setting up as a tavern-keeper? Secession Hall, Charleston, S. C. Oh, no, Governor, I answered: I was thinking of something very diffeorking majority. A large portion of the New England delegates, who went to Charleston by sea in a steamer chartered by themselves, returned by land, and on their jhe Hon. Caleb Cushing, who had been elected to preside over the convention at Charleston, and who still presided over its deliberations at Baltimore, abandoned the chcould be nominated, I was willing to vote for him five times. When I reached Charleston, it was plain to me, and to everybody else of any discernment, that Judge Dou
as thought best to wait for the South to strike it at Sumter, where some three thousand armed men had been assembled, and batteries erected with which to defend Charleston and attack Sumter. This state of things so far satisfied our legislature that war was neither near nor probable, that on the 10th day of April it repealed unSumter. This state of things so far satisfied our legislature that war was neither near nor probable, that on the 10th day of April it repealed unanimously, so far as any roll call shows, the emergency appropriation, leaving only money enough to pay for the expenditures already incurred. How well I remember the tone of the articles in the newspapers at this time, which accused me of a desire to feed the moths with overcoats, and praised my shrewdness in getting up the scd how little the legislature of Massachusetts knew of the condition of the country, and of the determination of the South to make war. The rebels opened fire on Fort Sumter. Gen. William Schouler, who was the first adjutant-general appointed by Governor Andrew, and who remained in that office during the war, published a book in
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 5: Baltimore and Fortress Monroe. (search)
of April, Washington was never in any danger of being captured for the next Montgomery, Ala., showing State Capitol in 1861. from sketch made in 1861. two years, until Lee crossed the Potomac. Why it was not captured within ten days after Fort Sumter was fired upon has always since been a subject of careful consideration on my part, and a thing which I have been entirely unable to understand. Davis must have known, and did know, that the firing on Sumter was as pronounced an act of war until the 6th day of May, for it was passed in secret session and the seal of secrecy was not removed till then. That secrecy, however, has nothing to do with the question under consideration. The rebels knew it was war. Davis had, around Charleston, four or five thousand troops, fully armed and equipped, who had been organizing and drilling, with Beauregard in command. Here was a disciplined army, and one larger than could be got together elsewhere in the United States in ten days. Ander
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 7: recruiting in New England. (search)
rts. As to the bombardment of our cities, that is a bug-a-boo which might have been more potent then than it would be now. We have since demonstrated that bombardment does not do a great deal of harm to a city. We bombarded the little city of Charleston for eighteen months steadily, and we did not do $50,000 worth of actual damage; we did not kill as many men in Charleston as we burned tons of powder. There will be no more bombardments of forts even, since the fiasco of Porter at Forts JacksoCharleston as we burned tons of powder. There will be no more bombardments of forts even, since the fiasco of Porter at Forts Jackson and St. Philip. Bombardments as matters of importance in war will take their place with bayonet wounds and sword cuts. I was casting my eye the other day over a page of the consolidated report of the wounds received at the battles of North Anna, from May 21 to May 26, 1864. In these engagements the total strength of the army was 51,659, and the whole number of wounded was 1,046. There was just one bayonet wound and no sword cut. Yet we all remember we were told how reckless the enemy was
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 8: from Hatteras to New Orleans. (search)
ent set fire to the wooden barracks and officers' quarters, which burned all night. Porter ceased firing while the burning was going on, supposing that the fort would be destroyed. But that fire had the same effect as when the enemy fired on Fort Sumter and set fire to the same class of buildings. They supposed that Sumter must surrender on account of that fire. But that fire, and this one, too, only cleared the fort of obstructions and obstacles. Of the fact that the fort had neither beenSumter must surrender on account of that fire. But that fire, and this one, too, only cleared the fort of obstructions and obstacles. Of the fact that the fort had neither been disabled nor surrendered Porter received information the next morning by a prompt and vigorous response to the fire of the mortars, and at 11.30 a rifle ball from the fort pierced one of his schooners and sunk it in twenty minutes. This bombardment went on for six days. How little harm was done appears from the report of the Confederate Brigadier-General Duncan, who had charge of the forts, in his report to General Lovell of the Confederate army:-- Heavy and continued bombardment all night
estion must have arisen in the mind of the reader, in poring over the administration of these many civil affairs: Were military operations delayed while these things were being done? By no means. Farragut and myself were ordered to do two things, if we could; first, to open the Mississippi River; second, to capture Mobile. Now, the capture of Mobile was of no earthly military consequence to anybody. It was like the attempted capture of Savannah, Port Royal, Fernandina, Brunswick, and Charleston, in which places the lives of so many good men were sacrificed. These places could all have been held by a few vessels under the command of vigilant, energetic, and ambitious young naval officers. The absolute inability of the Confederacy to have a navy or any force on the sea, ought to have suggested to us a militia navy for coast protection and defence. Then there could have been an early concentration of our troops into large armies for the purpose of instruction and discipline; an
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 12: administration of finances, politics, and justice.--recall. (search)
hey now depreciate) with which to buy bread. All other property has become nearly valueless from the calamities of this iniquitous and unjust war, begun by rebellious guns turned on the flag of our prosperous and happy country floating over Fort Sumter. Saved from the general ruin by the system of financiering, bank stocks alone are now selling at great premiums in the market, while the stockholders have received large dividends. To equalize, as far as may be, this general loss; to have . be immediately executed by hanging, the undersigned hereby offers a reward of ten thousand dollars ($10,000) for the capture and delivery of the said Benjamin F. Butler, dead or alive, to any proper Confederate authority. Richard Yeadon. Charleston, S. C., January 1. He did not get my head, but I did afterwards send for him, but got only his door-plate, the man himself having run away. The she publication was from the Charleston Courier:-- A daughter of South Carolina writes to the
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 13: occupations in 1863; exchange of prisoners. (search)
aval prisoners independently of our commissioner. There have been many negroes captured from the navy who are thus abandoned to their fate. Is it not possible for the government to have a policy? If Sherman exchanges at Atlanta, if Foster at Charleston, if Canby at New Orleans, and Rosecrans in Missouri, then I do not see why see should not exchange here. Our soldiers will not be too well pleased to hear that sailors can and soldiers cannot be exchanged. Benj. F. Butler, Major-General Commary of all the sick and wounded. See Appendix No. 11 He was also enabled to effect an arrangement for feeding and clothing our prisoners, whom he found in a most filthy and destitute condition. The further exchange had to be transferred to Charleston because of the operations of General Sherman, but Colonel Mulford succeeded in getting about twelve thousand men. In pursuance of the negotiations concluded by Colonel Mulford, an order See Appendix No. 12. was issued, Convalescent colored
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 14: in command of the Army of the James. (search)
s, celerity, distance, and secrecy, was never before equalled, in any particular, in the history of war. On the 30th of April I received from General Grant my final orders, See Appendix No. 23. to start my forces on the night of the 4th of May so as to get up James River as far as possible by daylight the next morning, and to push on with the greatest energy from that time for the accomplishment of the object designated in the plan of campaign. General Gillmore did not arrive from Charleston until the 3d of May, so that I was deprived of the full opportunity of organizing the Tenth Corps, and did not have so much consultation with him upon the plans of the movement as was desirable. His reasons for the delay were substantially set forth in a letter which I addressed to General Grant on the 20th of April. See Appendix No. 24. The iron-clads had not come up, and both these causes of delay were sources of great anxiety as well to the lieutenant-general as to the general com
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