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House, and from that time the business of organizing and getting the troops ready to go forward was turned over to me. Meanwhile, a direction came from Washington to send two regiments to Fortress Monroe, which was supposed to be threatened by the Confederates in Virginia. Indeed, a battery had then been commenced on the shore of Hampton Creek, opposite the fort, and a very curious letter was written to Colonel Dimmick, who was in command, which I saw afterwards, asking if the ladies of Hampton threw up a battery there, whether he would fire upon them while doing the work. That puzzled the gallant old colonel, as he told me, but he returned an answer in substance, that he could not allow anybody to erect a battery within the reach of the guns of Fortress Monroe, but that he would refer the matter to Washington. Transportation being furnished by water for the troops, the Third and Fourth Regiments sailed, one on the 17th of April, and one on the morning of the 18th. The latter
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 5: Baltimore and Fortress Monroe. (search)
forth-putting type. As soon as he was fairly settled in camp I ordered him to make a reconnoissance with his regiment across Hampton Creek into the village of Hampton. In it had been collected a few Virginia militia. As soon as Phelps got near the bridge crossing Hampton Creek, the rebel militia attempted to burn it. He made n them at double-quick, drove them off the bridge, and saved it. Crossing over, he occupied the town for a while, and then returned to camp about half way between Hampton and Newport News. This was organized as a camp of instruction and was named Camp Hamilton. At the same time that General Phelps entered Hampton, myself and stHampton, myself and staff made a reconnoissance about seven miles into the country, turning off at the road running up to Back River, and then skirting around until we struck the shore and then coming back to the fort. By this means I got full knowledge of the country within actual striking distance of the fort, except of that portion beyond Hampton Cr
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 6: contraband of War, Big Bethel and Hatteras. (search)
aid they belonged to Colonel Mallory, who commanded the Virginia troops around Hampton, and that he was now making preparation to take all his negroes to Florida soofication (though anticipated) was definitely known. I was then in command, at Hampton, of four volunteer companies of about two hundred men (one of them artillery wee slaves, the property of Colonel Mallory, commander of the rebel forces near Hampton, were brought in by our picket guard yesterday. They reported that they were ps. There was a point nine miles from the fort and on the road leading from Hampton to Yorktown, which I learned the rebels intended to entrench and hold, becauseryea to push out two picket posts at 10 P. M.; one two and a half miles beyond Hampton, on the county road, but not so far as to alarm the enemy. This is important. to pass out through their lines. Persons to be allowed to pass inward toward Hampton, unless it appears that they intend to go roundabout and dodge through to the
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 7: recruiting in New England. (search)
teers600    4 guns, 6-pounders60    2 companies cavalry120    Added on 20th:     Stuart's cavalry (Army of Shenandoah)300    2 companies Bradford cavalry120    8 guns (Pendleton's) reserve120    5 guns (Walton's) reserve75    6 companies Hampton's legion (arrived from Richmond)600         2,595  Add, also, Army of Shenandoah, not in position on the morning of the 21st, but came up during the day as reinforcements, 2,334                 27,3995,438                 Recapitulatiort.   Estimated. Effective Strength. Virginia, 1st, 2d, 4th, 5th, 7th, 10th, 11th, 17th, 18th, 19th, 24th, 27th, 28th, and 33d, being 14 regiments, estimated at6008,400   6 companies of 8th regiment, 3 companies 49th regiment, and 6 companies Hampton's legion60900   23 companies cavalry601,380     10,680 Tennessee, 1st regiment (1) 600  North Carolina, 5th, 6th, and 11th regiments (3)6001,800  South Carolina,
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 10: the woman order, Mumford's execution, etc. (search)
lien upon the building of something more than eighty dollars, and the land and buildings were now to be sold to satisfy that lien. Where are you living now? I asked. She said she had come to Alexandria and was staying there with a friend, waiting to see me. Can you wait there without difficulty until I can send down and see about this matter at Wytheville? She said she would thankfully, and that I would find her story correct. I immediately sent to Col. Thomas Tabb, of Hampton, Virginia, who had been a Confederate officer, and who had afterwards been my counsel in some matters of moment. I wrote him the story and asked him to investigate it and to purchase the title to that house in the name of Mrs. Mumford, and charge the amount to me, and telegraph me if it was all right. He telegraphed me within a day or two that the matter was as I had supposed, and he would attend to it. The morning I got that despatch, Mrs. Mumford came again to my office. I told her what had
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 14: in command of the Army of the James. (search)
was the highest point ever reached by the navy until after the surrender of Richmond. The admiral also doubted whether it was possible to make the movement a surprise, and argued strenuously against an attempt by the joint expedition to go above City Point,--Osborn, the point proposed by me, being almost twenty miles beyond by the river. To divert the enemy's attention, all the white troops were concentrated at Yorktown and Gloucester Point, and all the colored infantry and artillery at Hampton, the colored cavalry at Williamsburg, and all the white cavalry at the line beyond Norfolk in the direction of Suffolk. About the 1st of May West Point, at the head of York River, was seized, preparations were made for building wharves and landings, and fortifications were begun, as if with the intention of making this the base of operations for a junction with Grant's army. General Meigs, quartermaster-general, was of opinion that it would be nearly, if not quite impossible to gather