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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 249 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 118 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 104 2 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 78 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 62 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 52 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 48 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 40 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 36 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 34 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler. You can also browse the collection for Buras (Louisiana, United States) or search for Buras (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

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Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 2: early political action and military training. (search)
l of my life; and only when my ship was hourly expected to go to pieces, and when I importunately appealed to her good sense that our children must not be bereft of both parents, did she leave me to seek safety on board a gunboat. But of that more hereafter. She suffered great privations and hardships on the sands of Ship Island while we were awaiting the attack on New Orleans, and was on the first vessel containing troops that went up the river after the surrender of Forts Jackson and St. Philip. She went ashore with me and lodged at the St. Charles Hotel on the night after I took possession of the city of New Orleans. When in 1863 I was assigned to the command of the Department of Virginia and North Carolina, she accompanied me again to Fort Monroe. In 1864 she went with me to the field, and was present with me during most of the campaign of 1864. Thus I had an advantage over most of my brother commanding generals in the department and in the field, in having an adviser, fa
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 8: from Hatteras to New Orleans. (search)
red but not delayed below forts Jackson and St. Philip Porter's mortar-boat fiasco cutting the chRiver, showing defences of forts Jackson and St. Philip at time of bombardment. IV. The forts backson and the other end on the bank near Fort St. Philip. This barrier had been found impracticab rebels of any preparation of defence for Fort St. Philip in the rear; they had mounted no guns to they both were very low down, especially Fort St. Philip, and that the gunners of all the batterie at a point just above and at the side of Fort St. Philip. She had not moved from the place in whi General Williams, went up to the rear of Fort St. Philip, and I made my headquarters on Sable Islaine station, for the purpose of attacking Fort St. Philip in the rear. To get there I myself wadedfore this she had never moved a foot from Fort St. Philip, having no motive power. When reproachedr their brilliant exploit in running past Forts St. Philip and Jackson. I have borne and shall ever[8 more...]
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 9: taking command of a Southern City. (search)
t, I established at the quarantine station, seventy miles below New Orleans, a very strict quarantine, wherein thirty-two and sixty-eight pound shots should be the messengers to execute the health orders. Vessels were required to stop below Fort St. Philip, about five miles below the quarantine establishment, and there be inspected by the health officer, who would report to me by telegraph the condition of the vessel, passengers, crew, and cargo. The officer at Fort St. Philip was to allow noFort St. Philip was to allow no vessel to go up without my personal order, by telegraph or in writing, and this was not given unless the quarantine physician, upon examination below, reported a clean bill of health in every respect. If any vessel attempted to evade quarantine regulations and pass up without being examined, the vessel was to be stopped if there was power enough in the fort to do it. I required that the term quarantine should be used literally, and any The levee at New Orleans. vessel found with sickness on
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 10: the woman order, Mumford's execution, etc. (search)
But with that I have nothing to do. It may be remembered that I recognized a man parading in the mob in front of the St. Charles Hotel, wearing in his buttonhole a fragment of the national flag, which had been torn down from the mint, and that I ordered measures to be taken for his identification. Soon afterward he was arrested, but before he could be brought to trial there was another cause for a military commission. Six soldiers who were captured and paroled at Forts Jackson and St. Philip were confederating together to enlist a company to be known as the Monroe guard, Monroe being mayor of the city. This company, when fully organized, was to arm itself in the city and break through our lines and join Beauregard. These men, some of whom had been sergeants, were to be officers. This combination being brought to my notice, proper measures were taken to secure the prevention of its designs. The six instigators of it were brought before a military commission and tried for br
on a declaration of war, without any further notice to us, his fleet was to attack and take Forts St. Philip and Jackson, and move on to New Orleans. The rebels were to make an attack by land and disw the city at Chalmette, and using them to make proper water batteries below Forts Jackson and St. Philip, we could, without doubt, hold the forts against the French fleet, especially, since if they g. As Weitzel's Union report, and as Duncan's rebel report show, they left Forts Jackson and St. Philip substantially as defensible as before the week's bombardment, and their effect before Vicksbur To show the opinion of Admiral Farragut as to the cause of the surrender of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, it may not be uninteresting to append the following letter:-- U. S. Flag Ship Hartford, al Reynaud to take a trip with me down the river on my tour of inspection of Forts Jackson and St. Philip. He said he would be very happy to go with me. I was happy to have him, because I knew that G
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 12: administration of finances, politics, and justice.--recall. (search)
ommand, to wit: a day after the November election, so that it might appear as if the Republican administration had determined to put out of command all generals who had heretofore been Democrats, and to supply true Republican generals in their places. Ah! Seward, that trick was too thin. It did not work, as we shall see. I immediately made preparations to set my house in order. On December 12, I had such complete knowledge of Banks' movements that I telegraphed to Forts Jackson and St. Philip to salute Major-General Banks on his steamer with the number of guns appropriate to the commander of the department. When his steamer came to the wharf at the city, I had a battery of artillery to fire a proper salute, and my carriage was in readiness to take him to my house to be entertained. Here he served the following order upon me:-- War Department, Adjutant-General's office, Washington, Nov. 9, 1862. General Order No. 184. By direction of the President of the United States
e Appendix No. 141. He further says that all the shell that he expended in both days were not more than what he would expend in target practice in a month anyhow. See Appendix No, 138. Had he any motive for doing this? He says the expense was well incurred as it retires General Butler to private life, See Appendix No. 138. although he admits that the expense amounts to millions. See Appendix No. 139. I had criticised his foolish performances in bombarding for eight pays Forts St. Philip and Jackson, leaving the latter, upon which he expended most of his work, as defensible as before. Weitzel had so reported it, and therefore Porter did not like him, and me he hated as the devil hates holy water, and he did not show me the ordinary courtesy of conferring with me. He says on the first day (December 24th) Fort Fisher was silenced in an hour and a half. See Appendix No. 142. He says substantially the same of it on the 25th. I knew that it was not silenced and that
bility of being shelled by the enemy's gunboats (or the Tallahassee being seen in the river). It is to be remarked that Admiral Farragut, even, had never taken a fort except by running by and cutting it off from all prospect of reinforcements, as at Fort Jackson and Fort Morgan, and that no casemated fort had been silenced by naval fire during the war. That if the admiral would put his ships in the river the army could supply him across the beach, as we had proposed to do Farragut at Fort St. Philip. That at least the blockade of Wilmington would be thus effectual, even if we did not capture the fort. To that the admiral replied that he should probably lose a boat by torpedoes if he attempted to run by. He was reminded that the army might lose five hundred men by the assault, and that his boat would not weigh in the balance, even in a money point of view, for a moment, with the lives of the men. The admiral declined going by, and the expedition was deprived of that essential e
966. Boggs, Capt., Chas., at Forts Jackson and St. Philip, 367. Bonnegras, Mons., at Baton Rouge, 475. d Butler, 344; report regarding Forts Jackson and St. Philip, 369. Dracut, Mass., teaches school in, 73; ho1. Everett, Captain, reconnoitres in rear of Fort St. Philip, 363. Everett, Professor, treatise on yellowtine, Colonel, report regarding Forts Jackson and St. Philip, 369. Heckman, Gen. C. A., engagement of, nearassachusetts, 306; in charge of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, 467, 490. Juge, Paul, commander of European bnes, 180. Smith, Captain, aid rendered by at Fort St. Philip, 368; carries Butler to New Orleans, 370; remarhusetts, recruitment of, 306; on Ship Island at Fort St. Philip, 371, 467; cheers Butler leaving New Orleans, 5 prepares material for storming Forts Jackson and St. Philip, 358; valuable knowledge regarding those forts, 3ands troops against Fort Hatteras, 337; against Fort St. Philip, 368; in New Orleans, 375; makes demonstration