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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,057 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 114 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 106 2 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 72 0 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 70 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 67 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 58 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 56 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler. You can also browse the collection for George Washington or search for George Washington in all documents.

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Washington found advisable to go around Baltimore a useful pamphlet and George Washington's opinion of it preparing to capture the ferry-boat Maryland a soldier e reach of the guns of Fortress Monroe, but that he would refer the matter to Washington. Transportation being furnished by water for the troops, the Third and Foues warmly by the hand, and said: Thank God, you have come; for if you had not Washington would have been in the hands of the rebels before morning. Colonel Jones wxt morning. On arriving, he found all the ladies — the Custises, Lewises, Mrs. Washington, and others in the parlor, obviously in great alarm. Mr. Ross described t breakfast, and after a little while the Secretary of War came in and said to Washington: Have you seen Randolph's pamphlet? I have, said Washington, and by the eterWashington, and by the eternal God he is the damnedest liar on the face of the earth; and as he spoke he brought his fist down upon the table with all his strength, and with a violence which ma
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 5: Baltimore and Fortress Monroe. (search)
my brigade arrived in Washington on the 19th of April, having been obstructed, and some of them murdered, in their passage through Baltimore. From that hour Washington could get no reliable communication from any source; the wires had been cut, and the bridges of the only road connecting with the North had been burned. This s Leaving five hundred men to watch Anderson's seventy-five and work their batteries against the fort, why did not Davis cut the telegraph wires connecting with Washington, put say four thousand of his troops in the cars, and in thirty-six hours at farthest,--passing through the State of North Carolina, whose governor had refused y in the delay in the discharge of the mine at Petersburg, which caused the loss of some thousands of brave soldiers, and in the delays of Early, which lost him Washington in the summer of 1864. Within a few days preceding Sunday, the 5th day of May, I was called to Washington upon two occasions, each of which fortuitously resu
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 6: contraband of War, Big Bethel and Hatteras. (search)
and for tents and camp equipage, as my command was largely unprovided for in that regard. At last I sent my brother to Washington to get authority to buy some. He got it, and went to Baltimore and bought one hundred and twenty-five very good horsesI asked, on the 23d of May, for a few artillery and cavalry horses with their equipments. These were not received from Washington until July 21, and then only after every possible exertion on my part even to the extent, as we have seen, of causing tere I saw the importance not only of having the inlet open but of guarding and defending it. I had positive orders from Washington to sink the sand vessels. With my usual hazardous bravado I came to the conclusion to disobey orders and not sink the , arriving there at a late hour in the evening. I immediately made requisition for a train to take myself and staff to Washington, and we started at eleven o'clock at night. When we reached the junction of the Elkton Railroad with the Baltimore &
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 7: recruiting in New England. (search)
A great many Hunker Democrats enlisted for the war and fought nobly and bravely. But those who were men in position were deterred, from the fact that they could hold no place in the war as officers, and the cry went out from the copperhead press that this was to be a Republican abolition war, and not a national one. Meanwhile a regiment was raised by Governor Roby in the usual way, and a young West Point lieutenant was appointed colonel. But McClellan took the regiment away from me to Washington, and soon gave the colonel a very considerable promotion. This young man was afterwards captured, together with sixteen horses,--an event which gave rise to Lincoln's famous bon mot of that time. When the capture was reported to him, he said drily: Well, I can get brigadiers enough, but where am I to get sixteen horses? While negotiations were going on for the New Hampshire regiments I came to Massachusetts and called upon Governor Andrew. I had called soon after my first arrival hom
up. Then to my utter astonishment Weitzel added:-- But, General, we cannot repair those forts without an order from Washington. I will write General Totten, the chief of engineers, about it. I said an impatient word about Totten. What has hebe of any use to the enemy. The State library I placed in the library building in New Orleans, and the State statue of Washington, a very valuable relic, I sent to the Patent Office. I was certain that no attack would be made upon New Orleans, at ln advantage which Jefferson put forth as one of the reasons for the purchase of Louisiana. I could get no reply from Washington that I could have any reinforcements whatever. I had gone as far as I could get in enlisting the former soldiers of the rebel army to strengthen the regiments I then had. Accordingly I sent a confidential message to Washington saying that if they could not do anything for me by sending troops, I would call on Africa for assistance,--i. e., I would enlist all the col
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 12: administration of finances, politics, and justice.--recall. (search)
the secessionists, that McClellan with forty thousand men had been captured and carried into Richmond. Shortly afterwards another despatch came, reporting that Washington had been taken and that an officer of the New Orleans Washington Artillery had raised the Confederate flag on the Capitol. These sensational despatches were f the fleet. He said that he could get no answer from the Navy Department to his requisitions, and asked me, in his candid simplicity of character, to write to Washington, thinking that I might be more potent with the authorities there than he. My letter upon such a subject would be simply referred to the Secretary of the Navergiversation farther go? We may find out who possessed those qualities in the highest degree. Before Senator Wilson's answer came, I had received word from Washington, through a source which was always reliable, that General Banks had been sent down specially to relieve me, upon the demand of Napoleon, because I was not frien
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 13: occupations in 1863; exchange of prisoners. (search)
them in one particular part of the Confederacy, where we destroyed nothing of their resources, and did not diminish their capabilities of defending themselves. I stated that such a plan of operations could be carried on well enough, because Washington was then entrenched and fortified so sufficiently that if defended with half of the Army of the Potomac it could be held against any army that could be brought against it, especially as I thought there might be sufficient drain upon the Confedee Confederacy, for it is but a shell. Assuming the worst, before that army, if properly led, can be captured, there will have to be a very much larger army of the rebels brought upon it, and then our army can be sent down to help us as soon as Washington is relieved, and the fears of the administration for its safety quieted. This plan of operations, said I, is more or less faultless; but if something like this can be done, and I can have permission to get such a force together, and can be a
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 14: in command of the Army of the James. (search)
ine of the Dismal Swamp Canal in Virginia, and by the aid of the gunboats, the Currituck, Albemarle, and Pamlico Sounds, Roanoke Island, Hatteras Bank, Morehead City, Beaufort, the line of railroad from New Berne, and the cities of New Berne, Plymouth, and Washington, and as much land as was fairly within the pickets of the garrison of those cities in North Carolina. Upon inspection of these several posts it appeared to me that holding Washington and Plymouth was useless, because, while Washington was distant from New Berne only about twenty miles, and Plymouth perhaps a less distance from Washington by land, the enemy held the intervening territory, and the only communication between these places was by water by travelling a distance of from 120 to 170 miles. This opinion was reported to the War Department, but no action was taken, and I did not feel at liberty to order the evacuation of either place. November 16, an expedition under Colonel Quinn, with 450 men of the One Hundre
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 15: operations of the Army of the James around Richmond and Petersburg. (search)
ly destroyed Hood's army. From an interview with Sheridan, I learned what Lee and Grant had done in the march from the Rapidan. The position of Grant's army and its distance from Richmond, contradicted all the despatches I had received from Washington, and I judged that it was impossible for him to do otherwise than to take the alternative in the plan agreed upon between us, in case he failed to turn Lee's left and drive him back into Richmond, where I was to meet him in ten days. Evidently ondition of the general-in-chief of the army, saying of his confiding and ever-supporting friend that he would take it as a weapon to use against him, and which Smith himself afterwards did use. Then he got leave of absence, meantime writing to Washington to his coadjutor, Senator Foote, to have himself put in command of the Eighteenth Corps, independent of me, by his influence through his friend Senator Foote with Halleck. See Appendix No. 82. Before the 2d of July Grant learned that Smith
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 18: why I was relieved from command. (search)
ain, he is no rogue. And that was Ord's opinion I know, for I had his cordial friendship for years afterwards until his death. Meanwhile I had received from Washington, through the kindness of an official friend, a copy of the documents which Grant had sent to Washington to get leave to make the order. They showed me that Stat paid with regularity. I then loaned the quartermaster $53,000 to pay them up and keep the quartermaster's department going until funds could be received from Washington. This civil fund was a handy thing to have in the house. General Grant said that he learned after I was removed that there had been other arbitrary arrests.en had. Halleck telegraphed me to supply the information so far as my command was concerned, but I received none of his despatches. At last Halleck reported to Washington that he had repeatedly ordered me to give the strength of my force, but could get nothing out of me; that I had gone to Nashville, beyond the limits of my comma
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