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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 73 7 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 70 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 67 1 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 56 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 26 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 25 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 23 1 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 20 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 4, 1862., [Electronic resource] 18 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 15 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler. You can also browse the collection for Thomas Williams or search for Thomas Williams in all documents.

Your search returned 30 results in 6 document sections:

Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 8: from Hatteras to New Orleans. (search)
and moves against the forts from the Rear circumstances of their surrender to Porter testimony of the Confederates some remarks concerning Porter It was my intention to call at Fort Hatteras in my steamer, the Mississippi, to take off General Williams, who had been in command there and who had been detailed to me as a brigadier-general, at my request. The sea was calm and the night beautiful, with a light southwest wind blowing. As we were to go around Cape Hatteras, a course always dWhen I got to the head of the passes, that is, where the Southwest Pass, the South Pass, and Pass a l'outre, to the easterly, form several means of passage from the river to the Gulf, all my troops and steamers, under the personal command of General Williams, went up to the rear of Fort St. Philip, and I made my headquarters on Sable Island. I was delayed twenty-four hours by the Miami running aground, and I was much in need of light draft steamers, for which I had made requisition on the qua
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 9: taking command of a Southern City. (search)
uthern City. Entering New Orleans the City untamed meeting the City authorities at the St. Charles Hotel Howling mob surrounds the building tell General Williams to clear the streets with artillery proclamation to the citizens buying sugar to ballast vessels property burned at instigation of Confederate leaders alCaptain De Kay crowded through the mob into the hotel. His uniform was almost torn off him. St. Charles Hotel, New Orleans. Touching his cap, he said: General Williams' compliments, and he bids me say to the general commanding that the mob is getting unruly, and asks for orders as to what shall be done with them. Give my compliments to General Williams, I answered quietly, and tell him to clear the streets at once with his artillery. The captain left with the message. The members of the city government all sprang to their feet, crying: Don't, General; Don't give such an order as that. Why this emotion, gentlemen? I said. The cannon are n
al deep enough. To capture by assault with Williams' brigade was not practicable, and as Vicksburerate with the navy, and, in conjunction with Williams, to make the attack. Now, mark: Vicksburg New Orleans, La., June 6, 1862. Brigadier-General Thomas Williams, Commanding forces, Baton Rouge,licacy in calling for the co-operation of General Williams I addressed to him the following letter:-eneral Williams' brigade at Vicksburg. General Williams was sent up at a time when we should haveneral Grant for information as well as to General Williams. I have the honor to be your obedient re. Respectfully, your obedient servant, T. Williams, Brigadier-General Volunteers. Capt. R. S. e Gulf the sad event of the death of Brig.-Gen. Thomas Williams, commanding Second Brigade, in camp allant, and successful fellow soldier. General Williams graduated at West Point in 1837; at once evoted Christian. All and more went out when Williams died. By a singular felicity the manner of h[9 more...]
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 18: why I was relieved from command. (search)
, who was commissary general of the army, and they at once got detailed to positions in the commissary department where they could buy pork and beans for the army, which was thought to be a very soft place. Four of the others got detailed into the quartermaster-general's department, where they could buy mules and hire steamboats. Two more of them got into the adjutant-general's department, where they sat at desks. There were three or four older officers,--one of whom was the lamented General Williams, of whom I have already spoken,--who had been in the Mexican War, who retained their commands in the line and took their chances in battle. Now, I am not saying one word against those young men, but I am only showing to what — for some of them afterwards were on my staff and served well — an education at West Point brought the ambition of its pupils. It was not the fault of the men, but of the system. The claim to that superiority, because they had a regular education, broke out no
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 19: observations upon matters connected with the War. (search)
f Worcester, of the Thirtieth Massachusetts, as acting chief commissary, who served until the detail from Washington of Shaffer and Turner. When I was sent to New Orleans I had three brigadier-generals assigned to me: Gen. J. W. Phelps, Gen. Thomas Williams, and General Sherman. The latter died from heart failure very soon after he joined me. I had no better soldier or officer, none in whose care I felt any more safe to leave everything in possession, than General Phelps. I had got him htions because I held that nothing could be done about freeing the slave, except through the President, he resigned his command and reported to Washington to argue the question with the President, so that I lost him. He is now deceased. Of General Williams and his services I said all that ever can be said in my general order of notice of his untimely death. Gen. George F. Shepley was promoted to be brigadier-general and at the same time was appointed Governor of Louisiana. I would that s
145; why Butler supported, 148; supporters meet in Washington, 148, 150; part of his corps ordered to Vicksburg, 458, 463; sent against New Orleans, 470; attacks Williams at Baton Rouge, 481, 483; spies report regarding forces of, 484-485; General reference to, 891. Briggs, Capt. Henry S., 174; anecdote of, 189. bright, Jess knowledge regarding those forts, 359, 363, 365; report regarding forts, 369; examines and repairs forts, 465, 468, 490; letter from Count Mejan, 474; reports on Williams' position at Baton Rouge, 481; experience with colored troops, 496-500; man to take Port Hudson, 531; advises Butler, 642; reference to, 649; suggestion at Druryowhatan, 640; repulses attack on Fort Pocahontas, 670. Wilderness, battle of, reference to, 636; Grant's report of, 646-647; reference to, 705, 710. Williams, Gen., Thomas, commands troops against Fort Hatteras, 337; against Fort St. Philip, 368; in New Orleans, 375; makes demonstration against Camp Moore, 460; before Vicksb