Browsing named entities in Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler. You can also browse the collection for Henry Wilson or search for Henry Wilson in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 6 document sections:

ains unfinished to this day. Being well acquainted with Secretary Cameron, as we had been Democrats together in the former years, I telegraphed him through Senator Wilson, then chairman of the Committee on Military Affairs:-- You have called for a brigade of Massachusetts troops; why not call for a brigadier-general and staf Marshal Keyes to report to me forthwith, and I will take care of him. Armed with that power I went into the office the next morning. My first visitor was Senator Wilson, of Massachusetts, who had just arrived from the North, and who naturally had a little respect for my opinions, because we had acted together for a number of years politically. In a few moments Lieutenant-Colonel Keyes came in and was introduced to Senator Wilson, and Keyes took part in our conversation, which he soon turned to giving some instructions to me as to what was necessary to make a good officer in war. What those qualifications were I led him on to detail in full, listening
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 7: recruiting in New England. (search)
ugh to do those things. This was because recruiting had come to an absolute standstill. Senator Henry Wilson, who was the chairman of the Committee of Military Affairs of the Senate, had openly saidoops were needed; that recruiting ought to stop. He was also on General McClellan's staff. But Wilson did not echo the wishes of his chief, for even then McClellan was demanding more troops for the n was averted. Meanwhile Governor Andrew, aided by the two Massachusetts senators, Sumner and Wilson, was doing everything he could to move the President and Secretary Cameron to interfere with my usive letters regarding me to the senators, and then published them. I do not think it affected Wilson much, because he had been a Whig, a Know-Nothing, and a Free-Soiler, according to the changes ofns, had not his appointment by the President been rejected by the Senate. This was done because Wilson, who was chairman of the Military Committee of the Senate, was afraid of Andrew, and Andrew had
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 12: administration of finances, politics, and justice.--recall. (search)
he reinforcements which were promised me from Washington. Very much wanting them hurried up, I addressed a letter to Senator Wilson asking him to use his influence with the Secretary of War in that behalf. Wilson wrote me an answer which is in itseWilson wrote me an answer which is in itself a curious commentary on governmental good faith. Your note, says Wilson, was placed in my hands to-day (December 2), and I have at once called upon the Secretary of War and pressed the importance of increasing your force. He agreed with me andWilson, was placed in my hands to-day (December 2), and I have at once called upon the Secretary of War and pressed the importance of increasing your force. He agreed with me and promised to do what he could to aid you and expressed his confidence in you, and his approval of your vigor and ability. I will press the matter all I can. Such an answer to an application for reinforcements was made twenty-one days after the oreceit, and tergiversation farther go? We may find out who possessed those qualities in the highest degree. Before Senator Wilson's answer came, I had received word from Washington, through a source which was always reliable, that General Banks ha
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 18: why I was relieved from command. (search)
esentative from Massachusetts where all were Republicans, yet remains to be made. The nearest approach to it was this President Lincoln recommended that one of the Twiggs swords of the three given him by Congress before his treason, and captured by me after it, should be by that body voted to me for patriotic services. This recommendation was made by the President without any application on my part to him. It was referred by the Senate to its military committee, at the head of which was Henry Wilson of Massachusetts. He presented the bill, had it referred to his committee, and put it in one of his pigeon-holes, where it has ever since slept the sleep that knows no waking. We enjoyed one set-off to the clannishness of West Point, and its opposition to every high officer that was not a graduate, and to the intrigues of each to pull the other down and set up himself. This was that the Confederate army enjoyed identically the same sort of setbacks from West Point, and I am inclined
h him all the troops, and you will have to depend only upon such as may have been provided in your programme with him. Your despatch will be forwarded to him, to apprise him of your condition and for his instructions. Your success thus far is extremely gratifying to the President and this department, and we hope your skill and good luck may accomplish all your wishes. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War. [no. 33. Seepage 644.] [Confidential.] headquarters Bermuda landing, May 7, 1864. Hon. Henry Wilson: My Dear Sir:--I must take the responsibility of asking you to bring before the Senate at once the name of General Gillmore, and have his name rejected by your body. General Gillmore may be a very good engineer officer, but he is wholly useless in the movement of troops. He has been behind in every movement. He has lost twenty-four hours here in putting his line in a state of defence; but, above all, he has refused to move when ordered. I directed him to co-operate with General
32, 891, 899; rent for government lands collected at, 844; Butler at, 863; Butler gives dinner to West Point officers, 864-865; the alleged irregularities at, 871; Shepley takes charge of, 871; Davis confined in, 915. Fort Pocahontas, formerly Wilson's wharf, 627; attacked by Fitzhugh Lee 669-670; gallant fight of negroes at, 670-671; Fort Powhatan seized, 640; Butler anxious for the safety of, 670. Foster, Colonel, seizes Deep Bottom, 694. Foster, General, relieved by Butler, 897. Fupon the Fort Fisher attack, 794, 798, 804, 810; aids the construction of Fort Fisher, 812; dying declarations of, 820. Whelden, Lieutenant-Colonel, letter to regarding State aid, 309-310. Wickliffe, Governor, at Baton Rouge, 483. Wilson, Hon., Henry, visit from Annapolis, 207; objects to further recruiting, 295; as chairman of Senate Military Committee, 318; neglects to carry out President's recommendation, 879. Wilson's Wharf, afterward Fort Pocahantas, 627; seized and occupied, 6